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Chapter 5 - Foot and ankle emergencies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 November 2013

Michael C. Bond
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore
Andrew D. Perron
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, Maine Medical Center, Portland
Michael K. Abraham
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore
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Summary

This chapter discusses the physiology, diagnostic evaluation, treatment, and prognosis of foot and ankle injuries, including Achilles tendon injuries, ankle fractures and dislocations, hind foot and mid-foot injuries, foreign bodies, and infections. Achilles injuries often present as a sudden onset of pain in the posterior aspect of the ankle, without direct trauma. Ankle fractures can have a variety of histories, from a simple twist and fall to a violent motor vehicle collision. The outcome of ankle fractures is as varied as the presentations, and depends on both the amount of energy involved and the presence of any associated soft-tissue injuries. Ultrasound is helpful in confirming the presence of radiolucent foreign bodies. After irrigation, a referral to orthopedics for removal with the aid of fluoroscopy is often necessary. The evaluation of a foot infection will vary based upon the suspected underlying clinical diagnosis.
Type
Chapter
Information
Orthopedic Emergencies
Expert Management for the Emergency Physician
, pp. 142 - 153
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2013

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