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Bibliography

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 January 2021

Robyn Faith Walsh
Affiliation:
University of Miami, Coral Gables
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The Origins of Early Christian Literature
Contextualizing the New Testament within Greco-Roman Literary Culture
, pp. 201 - 221
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

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