Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-8r8mm Total loading time: 0.249 Render date: 2021-12-08T01:58:26.625Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

5 - Adaptive transmission and reception

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 October 2011

Hong-Chuan Yang
Affiliation:
University of Victoria, Canada
Mohamed-Slim Alouini
Affiliation:
King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Saudi Arabia
Get access

Summary

Introduction

Most conventional diversity techniques target the worst-case scenario [1]. The general principle is to perform a fixed set of combining operations on differently faded replicas such that the combiner output signal exhibits a better quality. This basic design principle manifests itself in the conventional MRC, EGC, and SC schemes as well as those more recent advanced combining schemes discussed in the previous chapter, such as GSC, T-GSC, and GSEC. While this approach has proven to be very effective in improving the performance of wireless communication systems, especially when the channel experiences deep fades, it may lead to an inefficient utilization of the receiver processing resource when the channel becomes more favorable. Note that the same set of combining operations will still be performed even though the system performance may be acceptable with fewer combining operations in this case. This observation motivates the recent interest in adaptive diversity combining for receiver power-saving purposes.

The basic idea of adaptive combining schemes is to adaptively utilize the diversity combiner resource in such a way that the combiner output signal satisfies a certain quality requirement. The generic structure of the adaptive diversity receiver is shown in Fig. 5.1. Specifically, the receiver will just perform enough combining operations such that the quality of the combiner output signal becomes acceptable. For example, minimum selection GSC (MS-GSC) [2–4] is one of the first adaptive combining schemes.

Type
Chapter
Information
Order Statistics in Wireless Communications
Diversity, Adaptation, and Scheduling in MIMO and OFDM Systems
, pp. 97 - 161
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×