Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-8bbf57454-kknlk Total loading time: 0.869 Render date: 2022-01-23T23:07:39.894Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Chapter 12 - Thrombophilia and pregnancy loss

from Section 4 - Thrombophilia and fetal loss

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 December 2010

Sue Pavord
Affiliation:
Leicester Royal Infirmary
Beverley Hunt
Affiliation:
Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust
Get access

Summary

Successful pregnancy requires trophoblast invasion into the maternal uterine spiral arteries converting them into large dilated vessels. Microthrombi are frequently found in the vessels of the placentas from women who have experienced pregnancy loss and placental infarction has been described in the placentas of some, but not all, women who have a pregnancy loss and who have thrombophilia. Published meta-analyses suggest that factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A, and protein S deficiency are associated with an increased risk of recurrent early pregnancy loss and non-recurrent late pregnancy loss. Women with a history of pregnancy loss merit increased surveillance in subsequent pregnancies and should be given folic acid during pregnancy. Despite the lack of evidence from randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials, many clinicians are offering women with a history of pregnancy loss found to have a heritable thrombophilia self-administered prophylactic doses of low molecular weight heparin daily low dose aspirin in subsequent pregnancies.
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2010

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×