Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-dc8c957cd-cpb9g Total loading time: 1.286 Render date: 2022-01-27T21:45:14.466Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Chapter 11 - Red Cell Alloimmunization

from Section 4 - Fetal Maternal Alloimmune Syndromes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2018

Sue Pavord
Affiliation:
University of Oxford
Beverley Hunt
Affiliation:
King's College London
Get access
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Royal Institute for Clinical Excellence. Guidance on the Use of Routine Antenatal Anti-D Prophylaxis. Green-Top Guideline no. 22. RCOG Press, 2002.
Crowther, C, Middleton, P. Anti-D administration after childbirth for preventing Rhesus alloimmunization. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 1997; (2): CD000021.Google Scholar
Jabara, S, Barnhart, KT. Is Rh immune globulin needed in early first-trimester abortion? A review. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 2003; 188: 623627.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
National Institute for Clinical Excellence. Guidance on the Use of Routine Antenatal Anti-D Prophylaxis for RhD-negative Women. Technology Appraisal Guidance no. 41. http://www.nice.org.uk; 2002.
Chitty, LS, Finning, K, Wade, A et al. Diagnostic accuracy of routine antenatal determination of fetal RHD status across gestation: population based cohort study. BMJ 2014; 349: g5243. doi: 10.1136/bmj.g5243.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bennett, PR, Le Van Kim, C, Colin, Y et al. Prenatal determination of fetal RhD type by DNA amplification. New England Journal of Medicine 1993; 329: 607610.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sikkel, E, Vandenbussche, FPHA, Oepkes, D et al. Amniotic fluid Δ OD450 values accurately predict severe fetal anemia in D-alloimmunization. Obstetrics and Gynecology 2002; 100: 5157.Google Scholar
Nicolaides, KH, Soothill, PW, Clewell, W, Rodeck, CH. Rh disease: intravascular fetal blood transfusion by cordocentesis. Fetal Therapy 1986; 1: 185192.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dodd, JM, Windrim, RC, van Kamp, IL. Techniques of intrauterine fetal transfusion for women with red cell isoimmunization for improving health outcomes (Review). Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012; (9): CD007096.Google Scholar
Milkins, C, Berryman, J, Cantwell, C et al. Guidelines for pre‐transfusion compatibility procedures in blood transfusion laboratories. Transfusion Medicine 2013; 23(1): 335.Google ScholarPubMed
RCOG. The Management of Women with Red Cell Antibodies During Pregnancy. Green-Top Guideline No. 65. London: Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists; 2014.
Lo, YMD, Corbetta, N, Chamberlain, PF et al. Presence of fetal DNA in maternal plasma and serum. Lancet 1997; 350: 485487.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Chitty, LS, van der Schoot, CE, Hahn, S, Avent, ND. SAFE – The special non-invasive advances in fetal and neonatal evaluation network: aims and achievements. Prenatal Diagnosis 2008; 28: 8388.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Daniels, G, Finning, K, Martin, P, Summers, J. Fetal blood group genotyping. Present and future. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 2006; 1075: 8895.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mari, G, Deter, RL, Carpenter, RL et al. Non-invasive diagnosis by Doppler ultrasonography of fetal anemia due to maternal red-cell alloimmunization. Collaborative Group for the Assessment of the Blood Velocity in Anemic Fetuses. New England Journal of Medicine 2000; 342: 914.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pereira, L, Jenkins, TM, Berghella, V. Conventional management of maternal red cell alloimmunization compared with management by Doppler assessment of middle cerebral artery peak systolic velocity. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 2003; 189: 10021006.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ruma, MS, Moise, KJ, Kim, E et al. Combined plasmapheresis and intravenous immune globulin for the treatment of severe maternal red cell alloimmunization. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 2007; 196: 138.e1138.e6.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Jackson, JC. Adverse events associated with exchange transfusion in healthy and ill newborns. Pediatrics 1997; 99: E7.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Alcock, GS, Liley, H. Immunoglobulin infusion for isoimmune hemolytic jaundice in neonates. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2002; (3): CD003313.Google Scholar
Clausen, FB, Christiansen, M, Steffensen, R et al. Report of the first nationally implemented clinical routine screening for fetal RHD in D-pregnant women to ascertain the requirement for antenatal RhD prophylaxis. Transfusion 2012; 52: 752758.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tiblad, E, Wikman, AT, Ajne, G et al. Targeted routine antenatal anti-D prophylaxis in the prevention of RhD immunization: outcome of a new antenatal screening and prevention program. PLoS One 2013; 8: e70984.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kent, J, Farrell, AM, Soothill, P. Routine administration of Anti-D: the ethical case for offering pregnant women fetal RHD genotyping and a review of policy and practice. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth 2014; 14: 87.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Szczepura, A, Osipenko, L, Freeman, K. A new fetal RHD genotyping test: Costs and benefits of mass testing to target antenatal anti-D prophylaxis in England and Wales. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth 2011; 11: 5.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kumpel, BM. Efficacy of RhD monoclonal antibodies in clinical trails as replacement therapy for prophylactic anti-D immunoglobulin: more questions than answers. Vox Sanguinis 2007; 93: 99111.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Urbaniak, SJ. Noninvasive approaches to the management of RhD hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. Transfusion 2008; 48: 25.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Nielson, LK, Green, TH, Sandlie, I et al. In vitro assessment of recombinant, mutant anti-D immunoglobulin G devoid of hemolytic activity for treatment of on-going hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. Transfusion 2008; 48: 1219.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×