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Chapter 3 - Inherited red cell disorders

from Section 1 - Cellular changes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 December 2010

Sue Pavord
Affiliation:
Leicester Royal Infirmary
Beverley Hunt
Affiliation:
Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust
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Summary

This chapter concentrates on inherited red cell disorders: sickle cell disease and thalassemia. Care of the patient with thalassemia involves collaboration of hematologists, endocrinologists, diabetologists, cardiologists, with occasional input from other specialities such as hepatology. The sickling disorders are a group of inherited chronic hemolytic anemias with clinical manifestations occurring as a result of the polymerization of hemoglobin S. The clinical manifestations in sickle cell disease are as a result of many interacting pathological processes including: polymerization of HbS, hemolysis and nitric oxide depletion, and vaso-occlusion. All patients with sickling disorders should be jointly managed by an obstetrician and a hematologist with interest and experience in these diseases. Since these pregnancies are high risk, patients will require frequent review by the multidisciplinary team. Deficiencies in red cell enzymes often lead to shortened red cell lifespan.
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2010

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