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Part I - Voices

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 August 2019

David Trippett
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
Benjamin Walton
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
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Summary

On the threshold of our modernity, on 29 March 1901, Lionel Mapleson made two artful cylinder phonautogramsof the air. It was no ordinary air. His wax tracings captured for posterity the legendary vocal tones of the fifty-year-old Jean de Reszke and the chorus of the old Metropolitan Opera House in Richard Wagner’s Lohengrin. The atmosphere was thick with anticipation for this final gala performance of the first twentieth-century season, an event that had been offered as an extra night to subscribers, and the last time that Reszke would appear in New York in a complete opera. The newspapers reported a crush as never before in the lobby and outside on the street for ‘the strongest cast which can be brought together’, including Jean’s younger brother Édouard, David Bispham, Adolph Mühlmann, soprano Milka Ternina and Bohemian–German contralto Ernestine Schumann-Heink.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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  • Voices
  • Edited by David Trippett, University of Cambridge, Benjamin Walton, University of Cambridge
  • Book: Nineteenth-Century Opera and the Scientific Imagination
  • Online publication: 07 August 2019
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  • Voices
  • Edited by David Trippett, University of Cambridge, Benjamin Walton, University of Cambridge
  • Book: Nineteenth-Century Opera and the Scientific Imagination
  • Online publication: 07 August 2019
Available formats
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To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Voices
  • Edited by David Trippett, University of Cambridge, Benjamin Walton, University of Cambridge
  • Book: Nineteenth-Century Opera and the Scientific Imagination
  • Online publication: 07 August 2019
Available formats
×