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14 - Why Were People Attracted to Paul’s Good News?

from Part III - Paul’s Theological Discourse

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 June 2020

Bruce W. Longenecker
Affiliation:
Baylor University, Texas
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Summary

The possible reasons why people were attracted to Paul’s message have been rather neglected in Pauline studies but are important to consider. However, we need to approach the task cautiously and make careful comparisons, for various reasons, not least to avoid any presumptions of Christian superiority. Possible reasons for the appeal of Paul’s “good news” are considered, ranging from more theological or religious reasons, such as escape from divine wrath and mystical experience, to more personal and social ones, such as Paul’s charisma and zeal, and community meals and mutual support.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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References

Further Reading

Beard, Mary, North, John, and Price, Simon. Religions of Rome: Vol 1: A History. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998.Google Scholar
Bird, Michael F. Crossing over Sea and Land: Jewish Missionary Activity in the Second Temple Period. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 2010.Google Scholar
Bremmer, Jan. Initiation into the Mysteries of the Ancient World. Berlin: De Gruyter, 2014.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Burkert, Walter. Ancient Mystery Cults. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1987.Google Scholar
Clauss, Manfred. The Roman Cult of Mithras: The God and His Mysteries. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2000.Google Scholar
Donaldson, Terence L. Judaism and the Gentiles: Jewish Patterns of Universalism (to 135 CE). Waco, TX: Baylor University Press, 2007.Google Scholar
Duff, Paul B. Jesus Followers in the Roman Empire. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 2017.Google Scholar
Hurtado, Larry W. Why on Earth Did Anyone Become a Christian in the First Three Centuries. Milwaukee, WI: Marquette University Press, 2016.Google Scholar
Longenecker, Bruce W. Remember the Poor: Paul, Poverty, and the Greco-Roman World. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 2010.Google Scholar
Meeks, Wayne A. The First Urban Christians: The Social World of the Apostle Paul. 2nd ed. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2003.Google Scholar
Meyer, Marvin W., ed. The Ancient Mysteries: A Sourcebook. San Francisco, CA: Harper and Row, 1987.Google Scholar
Mitchell, Stephen, and Van Nuffelen, Peter, eds. One God: Pagan Monotheism in the Roman Empire. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Turcan, Robert. The Gods of Ancient Rome: Religion in Everyday Life from Archaic to Imperial Times. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2000.Google Scholar
Wendt, Heidi. At the Temple Gates: The Religion of Freelance Experts in the Roman Empire. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016.Google Scholar

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