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15 - How Was the Reception of Paul Shaped in the Early Church?

from Part III - Paul’s Theological Discourse

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 June 2020

Bruce W. Longenecker
Affiliation:
Baylor University, Texas
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Summary

This essay provides a typology of different ‘Pauls’ in the early centuries (P, HP, HEP, PACTS, CanP), all of which may in some sense be rooted in the inheritance of the genuine letters (HEP), but are interpreted and reshaped in a variety of ways according to the needs, purposes, contexts and talents of early interpreters.  It identifies the key elements, practical, technological, bibliographic and hermeneutical, that shaped the interpretation of ‘Paul’ in the early church and enduringly throughout the history of Pauline interpretation that was to follow.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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References

Further Reading

Fredriksen, Paula. Paul, The Pagans’ Apostle (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2017).Google Scholar
Fredriksen, Paula. “Paul and Augustine: Conversion Narratives, Orthodox Traditions, and the Retrospective Self.” Journal of Theological Studies 37, no. 1 (1986): 334.Google Scholar
Gregory, Andrew F., and Tuckett, Christopher, eds. The Reception of the New Testament in the Apostolic Fathers. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kovacs, Judith L.Paul the Apostle.” In The Oxford Handbook of Early Christian Biblical Interpretation, edited by Blowers, Paul M. and Martens, Peter W., 614625. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019.Google Scholar
Lieu, Judith M. Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015.Google Scholar
Mitchell, Margaret M. The Heavenly Trumpet: John Chrysostom and the Art of Pauline Interpretation. Louisville, KY: Westminster John Knox, 2002.Google Scholar
Mitchell, Margaret M. Paul and the Emergence of Christian Textuality: Early Christian Literary Culture in Context. WUNT 393. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2018.Google Scholar
Mitchell, Margaret M. Paul, the Corinthians, and the Birth of Christian Hermeneutics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010.Google Scholar
Nongbri, Brent. “Pauline Letter Manuscripts.” In All Things to All Cultures: Paul among Jews, Greeks, and Romans, edited by Harding, Mark and Nobbs, Alanna, 84102. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 2012.Google Scholar
Pervo, Richard I. The Making of Paul: Constructions of the Apostle in Early Christianity. Minneapolis, MN: Fortress Press, 2010.Google Scholar
Roetzel, Calvin J. Paul: The Man and the Myth. Personalities of the New Testament. Philadelphia: Fortress Press, 1999.Google Scholar
Schröter, Jens, Butticaz, Simon, and Dettwiler, Andreas, eds. Receptions of Paul in Early Christianity: The Person of Paul and His Writings through the Eyes of His Early Interpreters. Berlin: De Gruyter, 2018.Google Scholar
White, Benjamin L. Remembering Paul: Ancient and Modern Contests over the Image of the Apostle. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014.Google Scholar
Wiles, Maurice. The Divine Apostle: The Interpretation of St. Paul’s Epistles in the Early Church. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1967.Google Scholar
Young, Frances M. Biblical Exegesis and the Formation of Christian Culture. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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