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Section 2 - The Condition of Neuropathic Pain

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 December 2013

Cory Toth
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, University of Calgary
Dwight E. Moulin
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Neurological Sciences, University of Western Ontario
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Summary

This chapter describes commonly used peripheral nerve injury models of neuropathic pain. It introduces the central, non-traumatic and orofacial models of neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain of central origin is observed clinically after traumatic incidents, such as stroke or spinal cord injury (SCI). An important consideration is that the pain experience, in humans and animals, has both sensory and emotional dimensions. The focus on nociception in pain research has been associated with the clinical failure of several potential pain medicines. An understanding of both sensory and affective dimensions of pain may improve translational research. Further, interpretations made from animal nerve injury models should be considered in the context of gender, age, and species/strain studied. Finally, it appears that no animal nerve injury model is without limitations, therefore, behavioral, physiological, and biochemical studies can only speculate on the relevance of experimental findings to human neuropathic pain.
Type
Chapter
Information
Neuropathic Pain
Causes, Management and Understanding
, pp. 33 - 100
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2013

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