Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-7ccbd9845f-vmftn Total loading time: 0.393 Render date: 2023-01-30T19:12:07.276Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

4 - The Spouse, the Neurological Patient, and Doctors

from Part Two - Public and Private Constructions of the “Neurological Patient”

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 September 2012

L. Stephen Jacyna
Affiliation:
University College London
Stephen T. Casper
Affiliation:
Clarkson University
Katrina Gatley
Affiliation:
Imperial College
Get access

Summary

Introduction

The period spanning the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries might be described as the age of the “specialist patient,” if only in response to the emergence of institutions and specialist doctors that required such bodies. In the case of nervous disorders, the Great War aided and abetted this development. The neurological patient of this paper—the Anglophile Frenchman Jacques Raverat (1885–1925)—and his illness narrative are also intertwined with the Great War. It was his failed attempt to enlist in the armed forces that precipitated his diagnosis by a specialist in nervous diseases of a central nervous system disease known as disseminated sclerosis. Patients such as Jacques, and those that returned from the war with head injuries and shell shock, were, like many with chronic or debilitating conditions, cared for in their homes, not hospitals. They were attended by family members and not by qualified specialist doctors and nurses. Caregivers were frequently spouses such as Gwen Raverat (1885–1957), whose chosen career was wood engraving, not caregiving. Malcolm Salaman, a well-regarded art scholar and critic, considered her “the most gifted and original artist using the medium creatively.”

These caregivers and modes of informal care often are absent from the literature of the history of medicine because, in the face of the welfare state, their provision was thought to have been dwarfed and subsumed by the political state. Their role was overlooked or, at most, considered through the prism of their absorption into formal systems of care. In the Western world, the late nineteenth to early twentieth century might be described as a period that saw the dissolution of informal care; its final blow was the introduction of the United Kingdom National Health Service.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer
Print publication year: 2012

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×