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9 - The Staircase of Paris

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 September 2021

Henrik Jepsen
Affiliation:
Centre for Multilateral Negotiations
Magnus Lundgren
Affiliation:
Centre for Multilateral Negotiations
Kai Monheim
Affiliation:
Centre for Multilateral Negotiations
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Summary

The perspective of the African Group of Negotiators (AGN) and the Least Developed Countries (LDCs) is provided by Tosi Mpanu Mpanu. United around key demands including enshrining the principle of Common But Differentiated Responsibility in the Agreement, recognizing the impacts of climate change already being experienced by developing countries and the need to adapt as well as to respond to the losses and damages inflicted, these highly vulnerable groups were able to sign on to a deal in Paris with confidence thanks to a number of carefully crafted political moments that took place in the run-up to COP 21, including the funding of the first projects of the Green Climate Fund and the launch of a number of African initiatives. Mpanu Mpanu draws on his considerable chairing experience, to share some tricks of the trade for brokering consensus. He compares the “staircase of Paris“, which all countries climb at their own pace, to the elevator of the Kyoto Protocol, which only carried a limited number of passengers. Agreement in Paris was contingent on a more consultative French Presidency learning process lessons from Copenhagen, and on the right global political momentum.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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