Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5959bf8d4d-kpqxq Total loading time: 0.567 Render date: 2022-12-09T07:19:29.073Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

12 - The Power of Civil Society

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 September 2021

Henrik Jepsen
Affiliation:
Centre for Multilateral Negotiations
Magnus Lundgren
Affiliation:
Centre for Multilateral Negotiations
Kai Monheim
Affiliation:
Centre for Multilateral Negotiations
Get access

Summary

Jennifer Morgan describes how civil society worked to secure a fair and ambitious multilateral agreement as seen from her perspective as Global Director of the Climate Program at the World Resources Institute at the time. In her view, civil society had four different roles and functions: civil society (1) gathered together idea generators, analysts, and researchers ahead of time, (2) provided informal intelligence and diplomatic service combined with high-trust networks, (3) brought the voices of people into the negotiations, and (4) explained COP 21’s complexities and alerted the outside world. Morgan concludes that no single function or role of civil society made the difference in Paris, but the combination of them all did so. She highlights the “bursting of the UNFCCC bubble” as a main function and assesses that the 1.5°C goal, came into the Paris Agreement as a result of peoples’ voices being heard and listened to. Without the NGO contribution, it would have been much more difficult, perhaps impossible, to sow the seeds of change. Morgan suggests that civil society can use its principled and objective-based approach to its advantage and listen to allies in their movement.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×