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Chapter 7 - Intelligence, Society, and Human Autonomy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 January 2018

Robert J. Sternberg
Affiliation:
Cornell University, New York
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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References

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