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Episodic Ethics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 May 2010

Daniel D. Hutto
Affiliation:
University of Hertfordshire
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Summary

I guess I wont send that note now, for the mind is such a new place, last night feels obsolete (Emily Dickinson, 1830–1886).

She said: ‘Rejoice, for God has brought you to your fiftieth year in the world!’ But she had no inkling that, for my part, there is no difference at all between my own days which have gone by and the distant days of Noah about which I have heard. I have nothing in the world but the hour in which I am: it pauses for a moment, and then, like a cloud, moves on. (Samuel Hanagid, 996–1056, Vizier to the King of Granada)

Four temporal temperaments

The first thing I want to put in place is a distinction between one's experience of oneself when one is considering oneself principally as a human being taken as a whole, and one's experience of oneself when one is considering oneself principally as an inner mental entity or ‘self’ of some sort—I'll call this one's self-experience. When Henry James says, of one of his early books

I think of … the masterpiece in question … as the work of quite another person than myself … a rich … relation, say, who … suffers me still to claim a shy fourth cousinship'

he has no doubt that he is the same human being as the author of that book, but he doesn't feel he is the same self or person as the author of that book.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2007

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  • Episodic Ethics
  • Edited by Daniel D. Hutto, University of Hertfordshire
  • Book: Narrative and Understanding Persons
  • Online publication: 04 May 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511627903.006
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  • Episodic Ethics
  • Edited by Daniel D. Hutto, University of Hertfordshire
  • Book: Narrative and Understanding Persons
  • Online publication: 04 May 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511627903.006
Available formats
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Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Episodic Ethics
  • Edited by Daniel D. Hutto, University of Hertfordshire
  • Book: Narrative and Understanding Persons
  • Online publication: 04 May 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511627903.006
Available formats
×