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2 - The Court: power relations and forms of social life

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 October 2009

Girolamo Imbruglia
Affiliation:
Istituto Universitario Orientale di Napoli
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Summary

In 1834, a century after Charles of Bourbon made his triumphal entry into the city of Naples, an article by Emmanuele Taddei in the Annali Civili del regno delle Due Sicilie (Civil Annals of the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies) commemorated that event as follows:

Charles, whom we will call the Restorer, loved religion, justice and peace. He came to the throne in the prime of his life, and he wanted these things for the comfort of his people and the preservation of his Kingdom. If, in the difficult times that always precede and follow new events of state, he had paid more attention to the voices of cold politics than to the advice of these three faithful teachers and friends, he might have lost glory and Kingdom, and the Sicilies would have gone back to the hard condition of being a mere province.

Taddei added:

He reformed the abuses of the justice system, and gave simple order to all parts of the civil administration. He made the authority of the sovereign into an instrument for the common good, and the protection of its benefits were to be enjoyed by all. He was marvellously moderate, docile, humane, compassionate, and he knew how to punish but even better how to pardon.

Type
Chapter
Information
Naples in the Eighteenth Century
The Birth and Death of a Nation State
, pp. 22 - 43
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2000

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