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“Simples Réflexions,” Colonne-Lamoureux, Le Monde musical 30, no. 3 (March 1919): 68-70 (excerpt)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 October 2020

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Summary

Concerts Reviewed

February 2, 1919

Overture “Namensfeier,” op. 115, Ludwig van Beethoven

Brandenburg Concerto no. 5 in D major, BWV 1050, Johann Sebastian Bach

Passacaglia, C minor, BWV 582, Johann Sebastian Bach

La Vague et la cloche, Henri Duparc

Le Rhin allemand, Julien Tiersot

Armenia, canti armeni tradotti sinfónicamente, Gian Francesco Malipiero

Pupazzetti, op. 27, Alfredo Casella

Symphony no. 3 “Bucolic,” B-flat minor, op. 11, Albéric Magnard

February 9, 1919

Namouna, Edouard Lalo

Fantasietta, Théodore Dubois

Typhaon, Claude Delvincourt

L’Étranger, op. 53, “Introduction to Act II,” Vincent d’Indy

Symphony no. 6, “Pastoral,” F major, op. 68, Ludwig van Beethoven

February 16, 1919

Gwendoline,“Overture,” Emmanuel Chabrier

Dolly, op. 56, Gabriel Fauré

Orphée, Jean Roger-Ducasse

Clarinet Quintet, A major, K. 581, “Larghetto,” Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

La Belle au bois dormant, op. 48, Guy de Lioncourt

Symphony no. 4, D minor, op. 120, Robert Schumann

February 23, 1919

Les Perses,“La Tragédie d’Eschyle,” Xavier Leroux

Poeme depitié, Antoine Mariotte

Symphony no. 2, Augustin Savard

Ballade, F# major, op. 19, Gabriel Fauré

Petrushka, Igor Stravinsky

Simple Reflections

Yet another month has gone by. In spite of all the gazes bound to the past, in spite of all the mourning amassed during these years of holocaust, of all the sacrifices, be they desired or accepted, life is rising up from the ruins, perhaps the stronger for being more rarefied, perhaps intensified because of all those ardent and rich existences that were destroyed before they had expressed themselves, and which dominate our era with all the purity, with all the flame of their heroic youth.

We come out of those terrible years with new glory, but above all, with new duties. Each of us must envisage them as a whole, then consider our own.

Individually, the task could be easy, if it is only a question of a little selflessness, courage, and abandon of the heart.

Collectively, the thing is more complicated, as the problem needs to be tackled from the root before being addressed in close union, if, that is, we are to transcend the domain of utopia.

Nevertheless, it seems that the time has come to consider the situation seriously, frankly.

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Nadia Boulanger
Thoughts on Music
, pp. 82 - 90
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer
Print publication year: 2020

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