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Bibliography

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 May 2020

Amanda Eubanks Winkler
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Syracuse University, New York
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References

Primary Sources

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The Burwell Lute Tutor. Facsimile edition with introductory essay by Robert Spencer. Leeds: Boethius Press, 1974.Google Scholar
Cantus, Songs and Fancies. To Thre [sic], Foure, or Five Partes, both apt for Voices and Viols. Aberdeen, 1662. (subsequent editions in 1666, 1682)Google Scholar
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Comes Amoris; Or The Companion of Love… The Second Book. London, 1688.Google Scholar
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Music for Macbeth, ed. Winkler, Amanda Eubanks. Recent Researches in the Music of the Baroque Era. Volume 133. Middleton, WI: A-R Editions, 2004.Google Scholar
Musica Oxoniensis: A Collection of Songs. Oxford, 1698.Google Scholar
The New Treasury of Musick. London, 1695.Google Scholar
The Newest Collection of the Choicest Songs, As They Are Sung at Court, Theatre, Musick-Schools, Balls, &c. London, 1683.Google Scholar
One and Fiftie Psalmes of David in English Metre, whereof, 37. were made by Thomas Sterneholde: a[n]d the rest by others. Geneva, 1556.Google Scholar
Pemberton, E[dward]. An Essay For the further Improvement Of Dancing. London, 1711.Google Scholar
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[Price, Richard]. Orphans we are. London, 1674.Google Scholar
Purcell, Henry. Sacred Music Part V: Continuo Anthems Part II, ed. Thompson, Robert. The Works of Henry Purcell. Volume 29. London: Stainer and Bell, 2011.Google Scholar
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Simpson, Christopher. The Division-Violist: Or an Introduction to the Playing upon a Ground. London, 1659.Google Scholar
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Butler, Charles. The Principles of Musik, in Singing and Setting: with The two-fold Use therof, [Ecclesiasticall and Civil]. London, 1636.Google Scholar
Cocker, Edward. Penna volans or The young mans Accomplishment being The quintessence of those curious Arts Writing & Arithmetick. London, 1661.Google Scholar
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Dryden, John. The Indian Emperour. London, 1667.Google Scholar
[Dryden, John and Davenant, William]. The Tempest, Or The Enchanted Island. London, 1670.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Downes, John. Roscius Anglicanus, ed. Milhous, Judith and Hume, Robert D.. London: The Society for Theatre Research, 1987.Google Scholar
Duffett, T[homas]. Beauties Triumph; A Masque. London, 1676.Google Scholar
D’Urfey, Thomas. Love for Money: Or, The Boarding School. London, 1691.Google Scholar
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Dury, John. The Reformed School. London, [1650].Google Scholar
Elyot, Thomas. The boke named the Gouernour. London, 1531.Google Scholar
Evelyn, John. The Diary of John Evelyn, ed. de Beer, E.S.. Volume 4. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1955.Google Scholar
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Gerbier, Balthazar. To All Fathers Of Noble Families, and lovers of Vertue. [London, 1649].Google Scholar
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Hawkins, John. The English School-Master. London, 1692.Google Scholar
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Secondary Sources

Barrett, John. The Morning’s up. London, 1706.Google Scholar
Blow, John. Venus and Adonis, ed. Wood, Bruce. Purcell Companion Series. Volume 2. London: Stainer and Bell, 2008.Google Scholar
[Brewer, Thomas]. Great God direct our tongues. London, 1641.Google Scholar
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Comes Amoris; Or The Companion of Love… The Second Book. London, 1688.Google Scholar
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[Price, Richard]. Orphans we are. London, 1674.Google Scholar
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Simpson, Christopher. The Division-Violist: Or an Introduction to the Playing upon a Ground. London, 1659.Google Scholar
Synopsis Musicae Or The Musical Inventory. London, 1693.Google Scholar
The Theater of Music… The First Book. London, 1685.Google Scholar
The whole booke of Psalmes. London, 1562.Google Scholar
Ascham, Roger. The Scolemaster Or plaine and perfite way of teachyng children, to understand, write, and speake, the Latin tong. London, 1570.Google Scholar
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[Blow, John and Kingsmill (?), Anne], [Venus and Adonis] An Opera Perform’d before the King. Afterwards at Josias Priest’s Boarding School at Chelsey. GB-Cu Sel.2.123 (6).Google Scholar
Braithwait, Richard. Times Treasury: Or, Academy for Gentry, Laying downe excellent grounds both Divine and Humane, in relation to Sexes of both Kindes: For their accomplishment in arguments of Discourse, Habit, Fashion: and happy progresse in their Spirituall Conversation. London, 1652.Google Scholar
Brinsley, John. Ludus literarius: or, the grammar schoole. London, 1612.Google Scholar
Brome, Richard. The New Academy. In The Dramatic Works of Richard Brome Containing Fifteen Comedies Now First Collected in Three Volumes. London: John Pearson, 1873.Google Scholar
Browne, Gregorie. An Introduction to Pietie and Humanitie. London, 1613.Google Scholar
Butler, Charles. The Principles of Musik, in Singing and Setting: with The two-fold Use therof, [Ecclesiasticall and Civil]. London, 1636.Google Scholar
Cocker, Edward. Penna volans or The young mans Accomplishment being The quintessence of those curious Arts Writing & Arithmetick. London, 1661.Google Scholar
A Collection for the Improvement of Husbandry and Trade, volume 6, no. 134 (Friday, 22 February 1694/5).Google Scholar
Coote, Edmund. The English schoole-maister. London, 1596.Google Scholar
Davies, Sir John. Orchestra or a Poeme of Dauncing. Judicially proouing the true observation of time and measure, in the Authenticall and laudable use of Dauncing. London, 1596.Google Scholar
Dryden, John. The Indian Emperour. London, 1667.Google Scholar
[Dryden, John and Davenant, William]. The Tempest, Or The Enchanted Island. London, 1670.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Downes, John. Roscius Anglicanus, ed. Milhous, Judith and Hume, Robert D.. London: The Society for Theatre Research, 1987.Google Scholar
Duffett, T[homas]. Beauties Triumph; A Masque. London, 1676.Google Scholar
D’Urfey, Thomas. Love for Money: Or, The Boarding School. London, 1691.Google Scholar
D’Urfey, Thomas. New Poems, Consisting of Satyrs, Elegies, and Odes Together with a Choice Collection of the Newest Court Songs Set to Musick by the Best Masters of the Age. London, 1690.Google Scholar
Dury, John. The Reformed School. London, [1650].Google Scholar
Elyot, Thomas. The boke named the Gouernour. London, 1531.Google Scholar
Evelyn, John. The Diary of John Evelyn, ed. de Beer, E.S.. Volume 4. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1955.Google Scholar
A Excellent New Play-House Song Called, Love for Money: Or, The Boarding School. [London], [c. 1691].Google Scholar
Gerbier, Balthazar. To All Fathers Of Noble Families, and lovers of Vertue. [London, 1649].Google Scholar
G[reene], R[ichard]. A Disputation, Betweene a Hee Conny-catcher, and a Shee Conny-catcher, whether a Theefe or a Whoore, is most hurtfull in Cousonage, to the Common-wealth. London, 1592.Google Scholar
Hawkins, John. The English School-Master. London, 1692.Google Scholar
Hearne, Thomas. Remarks and Collections. Volume 6. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1902.Google Scholar
Henslow-Alleyn Digitisation Project. www.henslowe-alleyn.org.uk/catalogue/MSS-9.html (accessed 16 February 2017).Google Scholar
Hoole, Charles. A New Discovery of the old Art of Teaching Schoole, In four small Treatises. London, 1660.Google Scholar
Ibbitson, Robert. Several Proceedings in Parliament 10 (30 November–7 December 1649).Google Scholar
Ibbitson, Robert. Several Proceedings in Parliament 12 (1421 December 1649).Google Scholar
John Howes’ MS., 1582, Being “a brief note of the order and manner of the proceedings in the first erection of” The Three Royal Hospitals of Christ, Bridewell & St. Thomas the Apostle, ed. Lempriere, William. London: Septimus Vaughan Morgan, 1904.Google Scholar
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Jonson, Ben. The Staple of Newes. London, 1631.Google Scholar
Kingly and Carnaby Street Area,” in Survey of London: Volumes 31 and 32, St James Westminster, Part 2, ed. Sheppard, F.H. W.. London: London County Council, 1963. British History Online. www.british-history.ac.uk/survey-london/vols31-2/pt2/pp176-195 (accessed 19 August 2019).Google Scholar
[Kynaston, Francis]. The Constitutions of the Musaeum Minervae. London, 1636.Google Scholar
Corona Minervae; or a Masque Presented before Princes Charles His Highness, The Duke of Yorke, his Brother, and the Lady Mary his Sister. London, 1635.Google Scholar
Locke, John. Some Thoughts Concerning Education. London, 1693.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
The London Gazette, no. 742 (26–30 December 1672).Google Scholar
The London Gazette, no. 1154 (7–11 December 1676).Google Scholar
Lovelace, Richard. Lucasta: Epodes, Odes, Sonnets, Songs, &c. To Which is Added Aramantha, a Pastorall. London, 1649.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lovelace, Richard. Lucasta. Posthume Poems of Richard Lovelace Esq. London, 1659.Google Scholar
Machyn, Henry. The Diary of Henry Machyn, Citizen and Merchant-Taylor of London 1550– 1563. London: Camden Society, 1848. British History Online. www.british-history.ac.uk/camden-record-soc/vol42/pp28-34#highlight-first (accessed 28 September 2017).Google Scholar
[Makin, Bathsua]. An Essay to Revive the Antient Education of Gentlewomen. London, 1673.Google Scholar
Morley, Thomas. A Plaine and Easie Introduction to Practicall Musicke, set downe in forme of a dialogue. London, 1597.Google Scholar
Mulcaster, Richard. Positions wherein those Primitive Circumstances be Examined, which are Necessary for the Training Up of Children. London, 1581.Google Scholar
Musick: or a Parley of Instruments. The First Part. London, 1676. GB-Lbl 11621. f.31.Google Scholar
North, Roger. Roger North’s The Musicall Grammarian 1728, ed. Chan, Mary and Kassler, Jamie C.. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990.Google Scholar
[Northbrooke, John]. Spiritus est vicarius Christi in terra: A Treatise wherein Dicing, Dauncing, Vaine playes or Enterluds with other idle pastimes &c. commonly used on the Sabboth day, are reproved by the Authoritie of the word of God and auntient writers. London, [1577].Google Scholar
Peacham, Henry. The Compleat Gentleman: Fashioning him absolute in the most necessary & commendable Qualities concerning Minde or Bodie that may be required in a Noble Gentleman. London, 1622.Google Scholar
Pepys, Samuel. The Diary of Samuel Pepys, ed. Latham, Robert and Matthews, William. Volume 3, 1662. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1970.Google Scholar
Pepys, Samuel. The Diary of Samuel Pepys, ed. Latham, Robert and Matthews, William. Volume 8, 1667. London, 1974.Google Scholar
Phillips, Thomas and Bowen, James. The History and Antiquities of Shrewsbury. Shrewsbury, 1779.Google Scholar
A Pleasant Comoedie, Wherein is merily shewen: The wit of a Woman. London, 1604.Google Scholar
Prynne, William. Histrio-mastix. The Players Scourge, or Actors Tragedie. London, 1633.Google Scholar
A Publique Lecture On all the Languages, Arts, Sciences, and Noble Exercises, which are taught in Sr. Balthazar Gerbiers Academy. London, 1650.Google Scholar
Purcell, Henry and Tate, Na[hum]. An Opera Perform’d at Josiah Priest’s Boarding-School at Chelsey. By Young Gentlewomen. The Words Made by Mr. Nat. Tate. The Musick Composed by Mr. Henry Purcell. GB-Lcm D144.Google Scholar
REED: Shropshire, ed. B. Somerset, J. Alan. Volume 2. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1994.Google Scholar
Report of the Commissioners… concerning Charities in England and Wales, until the first day of March one thousand eight hundred and thirty-seven. London: Her Majesty’s Stationery Office, 1840.Google Scholar
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