Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-56f9d74cfd-h4v4t Total loading time: 0.465 Render date: 2022-06-28T02:40:30.455Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

8 - Quantitative and qualitative evolution in the giant armadillo Holmesina (Edentata: Pampatheriidae) in Florida

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 December 2009

Robert A. Martin
Affiliation:
Berry College, Georgia
Anthony D. Barnosky
Affiliation:
University of California, Berkeley
Get access

Summary

The formation of the Panamanian isthmus in the late Pliocene permitted widespread faunal interchange between North and South America. Previously, edentates (or xenarthrans) had been limited to South America since the Paleogene and had there undergone a moderate radiation into three major clades: the shelled cingulates (three families), the anteaters (one family), and the sloths (a minimum of four families). Two sloth genera, Thinobadistes and Pliometanastes, appeared in North America in the late Miocene, heralding the forthcoming interchange. The emergence of Panama increased the probability of faunal interchange, and eight edentate families dispersed into North America during the late Pliocene or early Pleistocene with varying success. The Pampatheriidae is a distinct lineage of shelled edentates, now accorded familial rank (Engleman, 1985; Edmund, 1987) and separated from both the Dasypodidae (within which they were long regarded as a subfamily) and the Glyptodontidae. Edmund (1987, pp. 6-7) listed character states that distinguish pampatheres from the other two cingulate families.

The presence of pampatheres in North America was first recognized by Leidy (1889) on the basis of isolated osteoderms collected in Florida. During the ensuing century, numerous additional specimens of pampatheres were collected in North America, predominantly from Florida, and to a lesser extent from Texas (James, 1957; Edmund, 1987). Webb (1974) and Robertson (1976) were the first to describe pre- Rancholabrean pampatheres from Florida. They demonstrated that a very large size difference separated Blancan and Rancholabrean pampatheres in Florida, with some Irvingtonian populations being of intermediate size. Prior studies had necessarily been limited to Rancholabrean specimens and thus could not have detected any significant evolutionary change.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1993

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
6
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×