Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-77c89778f8-vsgnj Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-07-20T04:47:57.978Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Preface

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 November 2017

Hossein Jadvar
Affiliation:
University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles
Heather Jacene
Affiliation:
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston
Michael Graham
Affiliation:
University of Iowa
Get access

Summary

Since the discovery of x-ray by Wilhelm Röntgen at the turn of the twentieth century, there have been monumental strides in the ability to image biological processes in health and in disease. Imaging has not only improved our understanding of the complex and dynamic underpinnings of disease but it has also entered the center of patient care for many conditions. Molecular imaging is a relatively recent term that has been coined in the world of imaging science. The Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) formed a task force in 2007 to develop standard definitions and terms to serve as the foundation of all communications, advocacy, and education activities in molecular imaging. The task force recommended and the SNMMI board approved the following definition for molecular imaging (1):

Molecular imaging is the visualization, characterization, and measurement of biological processes at the molecular and cellular levels in humans and other living systems. Molecular imaging typically includes 2- or 3-dimensional imaging as well as quantification over time. The imaging techniques may include radiotracer imaging/nuclear medicine, MR imaging, MR spectroscopy, optical imaging, ultrasound, and others.

The task force further elaborated that

molecular imaging has relevance for patient care: it reveals the clinical biology of the disease process; it personalizes patient care by characterizing specific disease processes in different individuals; and it is useful in drug discovery and development.

There are a few comprehensive books now available for detailed descriptions of methods and applications in molecular imaging. The aim of this book is to provide a brief introduction to the world of molecular imaging. It is not intended to provide an exhaustive list of all available or potential imaging techniques or methods, but major modalities and applications are included. The book will be useful for students, physicians in training, and others who desire to grasp the basic concepts of molecular imaging in an efficient manner in a relatively short time.

The book is organized by introduction of instrumentation, physics and methods of various imaging modalities, followed by several key biological processes that may be interrogated with molecular imaging. In each chapter, the brief discussion is followed by a bibliography, which may be referred to for additional information and a more in-depth understanding of the topic.

Type
Chapter
Information
Molecular Imaging
An Introduction
, pp. ix - x
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2017

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1. Mankoff, DA. A definition of molecular imaging. J Nucl Med 2007; 48:18N, 21N.Google ScholarPubMed

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats No formats are currently available for this content.
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats No formats are currently available for this content.
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats No formats are currently available for this content.
×