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Part III - Participation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 July 2019

Jérôme de Hemptinne
Affiliation:
Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
Robert Roth
Affiliation:
Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
Elies van Sliedregt
Affiliation:
University of Leeds
Marjolein Cupido
Affiliation:
Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam
Manuel J. Ventura
Affiliation:
Western Sydney University
Lachezar Yanev
Affiliation:
Universiteit van Tilburg, The Netherlands
Tom Gal
Affiliation:
Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
Thomas Van Poecke
Affiliation:
KU Leuven, Belgium
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Summary

Historically, aiding and abetting, as such, was not included in the Charter of the Nuremberg Tribunal or the Charter of the Tokyo Tribunal. Rather, Control Council Law No. 10 first provided for the criminal prosecution of persons who were ‘accessor[ies] to the commission of any … crime or ordered or abetted the same’. Oddly, aiding and abetting was also not explicitly included in the 1950 Nuremberg Principles or the 1954 ILC Draft Code of Crimes – in both documents ‘complicity’ is employed – but it reappeared in Article 3(2) of the 1991 ILC Draft Code of Crimes and in Article 2(3)(d) of the 1996 ILC Draft Code of Crimes. Nonetheless, it is now consistently found in the Statutes of all modern international criminal tribunals.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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