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Part VI - Other Forms of Responsibility

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 July 2019

Jérôme de Hemptinne
Affiliation:
Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
Robert Roth
Affiliation:
Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
Elies van Sliedregt
Affiliation:
University of Leeds
Marjolein Cupido
Affiliation:
Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam
Manuel J. Ventura
Affiliation:
Western Sydney University
Lachezar Yanev
Affiliation:
Universiteit van Tilburg, The Netherlands
Tom Gal
Affiliation:
Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights
Thomas Van Poecke
Affiliation:
KU Leuven, Belgium
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Summary

Command responsibility, as a modern doctrine of criminal law, originates in the atrocities committed by members of the Imperial Japanese Army in the Philippines between 9 October 1944 and 2 September 1945. That the atrocities – starvation, execution, rape and burning of homes – violated the laws of war is uncontroversial. More controversial, and of enduring doctrinal interest, was the potential individual responsibility of General Yamashita, Commanding General of the Imperial Army’s Fourteenth Group prior to his surrender to US forces.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

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