Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-546b4f848f-sw5dq Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2023-06-01T05:42:07.688Z Has data issue: false Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": true } hasContentIssue false

8 - ‘Indeed everybody did come’: Parties, Publicity and Intimacy in Gertrude Stein's Plays

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 April 2014

Get access

Summary

This chapter is concerned with Gertrude Stein's response to two modernist parties, one a dinner-party given by the English painter Harry Phelan Gibb and his wife Bridget in Paris in April 1913 to which Gertrude Stein and her companion Alice Toklas were invited by the host, and one a cocktail-party in Hollywood given by Lillian May Ehrman in Stein's honour in April 1935. These parties span the period of modernism, taking us from the expatriate, avant-garde fervour of 1910s Paris to the popular American culture of the 1930s and, crucially, they provide a means through which to approach the more overlooked area of Stein's oeuvre: her dramatic writing. Stein's drama begins in 1913 with the play she composed in response to the dinner-party at the Gibbs' and, for at least one critic, develops into ‘much more sharply focused and much more theatrical’ work in the 1920s and after, including her play written about the 1935 Hollywood gathering. The two parties also illustrate Stein's own trajectory as a modernist: in 1913, a patron and friend of artists such as Pablo Picasso, Juan Gris and Gibb himself, with relatively little of her own work in print; by 1935, a major American celebrity, with her arrival in New York for a lecture tour announced in lights on Times Square and her Four Saints in Three Acts broadcast nationally over Columbia Radio and the longest-running opera in Broadway history.

Type
Chapter
Information
The Modernist Party , pp. 147 - 163
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
Print publication year: 2013

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×