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4 - What Was Model Theory About?

from PART II - THE PARADIGM SHIFT

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 January 2018

John T. Baldwin
Affiliation:
University of Illinois, Chicago
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Summary

Pillay writes,

The notion of truth in a structure is at the centre of model theory. This is often credited to Tarski under the name Tarski's theory of truth. But this relative, rather than absolute, notion of truth was, as I understand it, already something known, used, and discussed. In any case, faced with the expression truth in a structure there are two elements to be grasped. Truth of what? And what precisely is a structure? [Pillay 2010]

We defined the notions Pillay refers to in Chapter 1. In this chapter we consider his questions more closely and consider some key episodes in the development of the notion of a first order theory as a focal point.

The Downward Löwenheim–Skolem–Tarski Theorem

The meaning of ‘contradictory’ underwent a vast change in the early decades of the twentieth century. It is important to read the famous letter from Hilbert ([Frege & Hilbert 1980], 39) in the 1899–1900 Frege–Hilbert correspondence as written by the turn-of-the-century Hilbert not the later Hilbert:

if the arbitrarily given axioms do not contradict one another with all their consequences, then they are true and the things defined by the axioms exist. This is for me the criterion of truth and existence. The proposition ‘Every equation has a root’ is true, and the existence of a root is proven, as soon as the axiom ‘Every equation has a root’ can be added to the other arithmetical axioms, without raising the possibility of contradiction, no matter what conclusions are drawn. ([Frege & Hilbert 1980], 39)

As we observed on page 33, the Hilbert writing this passage has not yet made the distinction between formal and informal language. Today we might replace ‘do not contradict one another’ by ‘do not imply 0 = 1 in an ambient formal system’ and the word ‘true’ by ‘satisfiable’ and read the first sentence as an instance of Gödel's completeness theorem for first order logic. Such replacements are anachronistic in several respects; not only has a formal sentence entered the discussion but it assumes the first/second order distinction.

Type
Chapter
Information
Model Theory and the Philosophy of Mathematical Practice
Formalization without Foundationalism
, pp. 89 - 118
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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  • What Was Model Theory About?
  • John T. Baldwin, University of Illinois, Chicago
  • Book: Model Theory and the Philosophy of Mathematical Practice
  • Online publication: 19 January 2018
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316987216.008
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  • What Was Model Theory About?
  • John T. Baldwin, University of Illinois, Chicago
  • Book: Model Theory and the Philosophy of Mathematical Practice
  • Online publication: 19 January 2018
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316987216.008
Available formats
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To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • What Was Model Theory About?
  • John T. Baldwin, University of Illinois, Chicago
  • Book: Model Theory and the Philosophy of Mathematical Practice
  • Online publication: 19 January 2018
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316987216.008
Available formats
×