Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-77c89778f8-7drxs Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-07-23T10:35:53.942Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

2 - Neo-Kantianism and Bakhtin's phenomenology

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 May 2011

Michael F. Bernard-Donals
Affiliation:
University of Missouri, Columbia
Get access

Summary

Bakhtin's interest in phenomenology – or, more specifically, the way in which the human mind comes to consciousness in a relationship with objects or other human subjects – stems from his immersion at the beginning of the twentieth century in neo-Kantianism, the dominant school of philosophy at the time. In the 1910s and 1920s, neo-Kantianism was largely imported from Germany, in particular from Marburg; at one time or another at the turn of the century almost all the chairs of departments of philosophy, both in Germany and in Russia, were occupied by neo-Kantians. Of the philosophers from the Marburg school, the most influential for Bakhtin was Hermann Cohen. In general, what interested Bakhtin and his colleagues during their gatherings in the years immediately following the Revolution was Kant's concern for founding a relationship between a theory of knowledge and a theory of ethics based in The critique of pure reason and The critique of practical reason. In the first of these works, Kant shows that human understanding cannot go beyond the phenomena of sensory experience, and thus questions about transcendent objects – God, for example – will necessarily be unanswerable. If one takes this transcendent knowledge as ultimate reality, then reality is unknowable, and as a result there can be no rational metaphysics. In the second book, Kant's aim was to remedy the problem established in the first.

Type
Chapter
Information
Mikhail Bakhtin
Between Phenomenology and Marxism
, pp. 18 - 46
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1995

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×