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Preface to the first edition

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2012

Andrew Ortony
Affiliation:
Northwestern University, Illinois
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Summary

In September 1977, a group of leading philosophers, psychologists, linguists, and educators gathered at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign to participate in a multidisciplinary conference on metaphor and thought which was attended by nearly a thousand people. Most of the essays in this volume are substantially revised versions of papers presented at that conference. The conference was structured around a number of topics, and some of that structure has survived the transition to book form. Specifically, in both parts of the book there are three topics, each addressed by three papers. The second and third papers of these triplets are frequently devoted, at least in part, to a discussion of the first paper. The first part of the book contains two additional chapters: an opening one by Max Black that might be regarded as “scene setting,” and a closing one by George Miller that might be regarded as a bridge between the two parts.

Because the conference constituted the genesis of this book, it is appropriate to acknowledge those groups and individuals whose help made it the success that it was. The principal source of funding for the conference was a contract from the National Institute of Education. Supplementary financial support was generously provided by a variety of sources within the University of Illinois. These included: the Advisory Committee to the Council of Academic Deans and Directors, the Center for Advanced Study, the College of Education, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and the Office of the Chancellor.

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Metaphor and Thought , pp. xv - xvi
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1993

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