Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768ffcd9cc-6vg6l Total loading time: 0.46 Render date: 2022-12-04T18:58:36.916Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

15 - Déjà vu and jamais vu

from Part III

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 January 2010

German E. Berrios
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
John R. Hodges
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
Get access

Summary

This chapter is concerned with two types of paramnesia: déjà vu and jamais vu. Paramnesia, a term which is nowadays rarely used in medical practice (Berrios, 1995), refers to a group of memory anomalies associated with both non-pathological and pathological conditions (see Chapter 14, this volume). It is to be regretted that current interest in memory disorders tends to focus on memory loss (as in the amnestic syndrome and dementia) to the detriment of the study of the paramnesias. Indeed, clinicians with little free time on their hands to keep up with the theoretical literature on memory disorders should be able to use the paramnesias as a vantage point to study the processes of memory. After discussing divergent views on, and describing some types of, ‘paramnesia’, this chapter will deal with the clinical features of the déjà vu and jamais vu experiences.

Paramnesia

Paramnesia denotes false memory. The term derives from the Greek para-, meaning from (the side), beside near, beyond, against, and -mnesis, meaning memory (Campbell, 1996). The term paramnesia was coined by Emil Kraepelin (1887) in analogy of terms such as paranoia, paraphasia and paraphrenia, as a general term ‘to denote pseudoreminiscences or illusions and hallucinations of memory’ (Burnham, 1889). Following James Sully's book Illusions (1881), Kraepelin (1887) differentiated between a total (völlige Erinnerungsfälschung) and a partial (‘theilweise Erinnerungsverfälschung’) form of paramnesia. The latter form is based on distortions or elaborations of real events, the former emerges independent of any real events of personal history. By comparison with perception disorders, the partial form corresponds with illusions and the total form with hallucinations.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2000

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
4
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×