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SECTION III - FROM 1831 TO 1836

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 August 2010

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Summary

1831

At the time when he left the College, Mr. De Morgan was living with his family in Guilford Street, but removed in the autumn of 1831 to 5 Upper Gower Street, where he lived till our marriage in 1837. His only sister had been married the year before to Mr. Lewis Hensley, a surgeon of ability and good practice. My own family left Stoke Newington and settled at 31 Upper Bedford Place, Russell Square, in 1830.

State of Science

In May 1828, shortly after his first coming to London, Mr. De Morgan had been elected a Fellow of the Astronomical Society, and in February 1830 took his place on the Council. Of the state of Science just before that period, Sir John Herschel said: ‘The end of the eighteenth and the beginning of the nineteenth century were remarkable for the small amount of scientific movement going on in this country, especially in its more exact departments. … Mathematics were at the last gasp, and Astronomy nearly so—I mean in those members of its frame which depend upon precise measurement and systematic calculation. The chilling torpor of routine had begun to spread itself over all those branches of Science which wanted the excitement of experimental research.’

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Chapter
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Memoir of Augustus De Morgan
With Selections from His Letters
, pp. 41 - 74
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2010
First published in: 1882

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