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Chapter 9 - The German- and Dutch-Speaking Lands

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 April 2023

Helen Deeming
Affiliation:
Royal Holloway, University of London
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Summary

The large territory of Northern and Central Europe covered in the Middle Ages by the Holy Roman Empire is considered in Chapter 9. We consider the music of mystics and visionaries, including St Hildegard of Bingen and the Dutch-speaking Hadewijch. Religious reform movements in northern areas and in Bohemia, including Modern Devotion and Utraquism, had important consequences for liturgical singing, and we observe the survival in these areas of polyphonic traditions apparently dating back to the centuries considered in Chapter 2. In the courtly environment, the Minnesingers took up the traditions of the troubadours, cultivating a distinctive approach to song in Middle High German and Middle Dutch. This chapter concludes with a manuscript of song whose name is well known but whose contents are difficult to classify: the thirteenth-century Carmina Burana juxtaposes Latin and vernacular, notated and un-notated, and the religious and secular, to a remarkable degree.

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Chapter
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

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References

Further Reading

Aubrey, Elizabeth, ‘Vernacular Song I: Lyric’ [see the sections on Minnesang], in The Cambridge History of Medieval Music, volume 1, ed. Everist, Mark and Kelly, Thomas Forrest (Cambridge, 2018), 382427.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bobeth, Gundela, trans. Henry Hope, ‘Wine, Women, and Song? Reconsidering the Carmina Burana’, in Manuscripts and Medieval Song: Inscription, Performance, Context, ed. Deeming, Helen and Leach, Elizabeth Eva (Cambridge, 2015), 79115.Google Scholar
Ciglbauer, Jan, ‘Quoting, Rethinking and Copying: A Few Remarks on the Tradition of the Monophonic Cantio in Central Europe’, Hudební věda, 51, 1–2 (2014), 2132.Google Scholar
Curry, Robert, ‘Music East of the Rhine’, in The Cambridge Companion to Medieval Music, ed. Everist, Mark (Cambridge, 2011), 171–82.Google Scholar
Gancarczyk, Paweł, ‘Petrus Wilhelmi de Grudencz (b. 1392) – A Central European Composer’, De musica disserenda, 2, 1 (2006), 103–12.Google Scholar
Hascher-Burger, Ulrike, and Joldersma, Hermina, ‘Music in the Spiritual Culture of the Devotio Moderna’, Church History and Religious Culture, 88, 3 (2008), 313–28.Google Scholar
Louviot, Manon, Controlling Space, Disciplining Voice: The Congregation of Windesheim and Fifteenth-Century Monastic Reform in Northern Germany and the Low Countries, PhD dissertation (Utrecht, 2019).Google Scholar
Meconi, Honey, Hildegard of Bingen (Urbana, Chicago, and Springfield, IL, 2018).Google Scholar

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