Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-8bbf57454-6xp8w Total loading time: 0.333 Render date: 2022-01-22T15:32:15.911Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

7 - Quantitative Content Analysis and the Measurement of Collective Identity

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2012

Rawi Abdelal
Affiliation:
Harvard Business School
Yoshiko M. Herrera
Affiliation:
University of Wisconsin, Madison
Alastair Iain Johnston
Affiliation:
Harvard University, Massachusetts
Rose McDermott
Affiliation:
University of California, Santa Barbara
Get access

Summary

CONTENT ANALYSIS INTRODUCED

Content analysis, simply put, is the quantitative investigation of message characteristics. Most definitions are a bit more specific than this, often delineated by the degree to which a scientific method is assumed. The following definition is employed here:

Content analysis is a summarizing, quantitative analysis of messages that relies on the scientific method (including attention to objectivity-intersubjectivity, a priori design, reliability, validity, generalizability, replicability, and hypothesis testing) and is not limited as to the types of variables that may be measured or the context in which the messages are created or presented.

(Neuendorf 2002: 10)

In content analysis, as in all quantitative investigations, the quality of a measure is dependent on several factors. First, there must be a clear conceptualization of the construct of interest, for it is the congruence between conceptualization and operationalization (measurement) that constitutes basic internal validity (Babbie 1998).

First, We Conceptualize

With the construct of collective identity, conceptualization can be problematic, in that theoretic approaches abound. Abdelal et al. (2006: 695) refer to the “definitional anarchy” of identity research and, as Bruland and Horowitz (2003: 1) note, “the existence of identity as a universal but largely implicit concept makes it difficult to isolate and understand its use.”

Type
Chapter
Information
Measuring Identity
A Guide for Social Scientists
, pp. 203 - 236
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
9
Cited by

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×