Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-7c2ld Total loading time: 0.303 Render date: 2021-12-02T08:13:11.884Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 August 2010

T. M. Lemos
Affiliation:
Rhodes College, Memphis
Get access

Summary

Those who think of cultural diffusionism as being long since dead in the academy would do well to look to biblical studies. Cultural diffusionism is based upon the concept of diffusion, or the transmission of features from one culture to another. Diffusionism, then, as one reference work puts it, “refers to any learned hypothesis that posits an exogenous origin for most elements of a specific culture or cultural subset.” Diffusionism as a mode of thinking flourished in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and its main proponents “aimed at a comprehensive survey of the spread of cultural traits from the earliest times until today. They developed complex … classifications of ‘culture circles’ (Kulturkreise) and surveyed their possible dissemination from an original centre.’ That is, the hypothesis that most features of any given culture will have come from outside of the culture led to the idea of “culture areas,” wherein various ostensibly distinct groups in actuality share very similar cultural traits. This is because these traits, at some prehistoric or historic point, diffused outward from the place, or “centre,” where they originally developed, lending a similarity to the cultures, or subcultures, of one area. Yet, once these culture areas established themselves, further cultural changes could still arise through the diffusion of traits from one Kulturkreis to another.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2010

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

  • Introduction
  • T. M. Lemos, Rhodes College, Memphis
  • Book: Marriage Gifts and Social Change in Ancient Palestine
  • Online publication: 04 August 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511750564.001
Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

  • Introduction
  • T. M. Lemos, Rhodes College, Memphis
  • Book: Marriage Gifts and Social Change in Ancient Palestine
  • Online publication: 04 August 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511750564.001
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Introduction
  • T. M. Lemos, Rhodes College, Memphis
  • Book: Marriage Gifts and Social Change in Ancient Palestine
  • Online publication: 04 August 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511750564.001
Available formats
×