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Chapter 12 - Micromanipulation, Micro-Injection Microscopes and Systems for ICSI

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 December 2021

Gianpiero D. Palermo
Affiliation:
Cornell Institute of Reproductive Medicine, New York
Zsolt Peter Nagy
Affiliation:
Reproductive Biology Associates, Atlanta, GA
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Summary

Micromanipulation technology has evolved rapidly over the past 30 years to meet the needs of assisted reproduction practitioners. The clinical outcome of micromanipulation and microinjection procedures is highly dependent upon practitioner skills as well as the quality and reliability of the equipment used. Well engineered mechanical, hydraulic and electronic micromanipulation systems are available and can be mounted upon inverted microscopes supplied by all of the major microscope companies. These systems are complemented by a range of oil and air injectors in addition to anti-vibration tables and lasers. In future, it is possible that some micromanipulation systems will become automated using computer algorithms, enabling robotic procedures to be performed, eliminating variability in practitioner performance.

Type
Chapter
Information
Manual of Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection in Human Assisted Reproduction
With Other Advanced Micromanipulation Techniques to Edit the Genetic and Cytoplasmic Content of the Oocyte
, pp. 114 - 128
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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