Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-x64cq Total loading time: 0.282 Render date: 2022-05-28T18:07:59.759Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

10 - Emerging infrastructure and services for research data management and curation in the UK and Europe

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 June 2018

Angus Whyte
Affiliation:
Digital Curation Centre
Get access

Summary

Introduction

Why try to predict the evolution of research data services and infrastructure? Enormous amounts have been invested in recent decades on programmes designed to strengthen the digital or ‘e’ aspects of research; the e-infrastructure for e-research or e-science. Emerging ‘research data infrastructures’ extend the reach of e-infrastructures, together with their agenda of transforming research knowledge production and use. What ‘data infrastructures’ bring to that agenda is the idea that research data itself can be provided as a utility, like computing or electricity grids. This idea envisages collaborative networks with a European and international span. Meanwhile, research funders and institutions are giving more attention to their own services for research data management and curation, in the effort to get more impact more efficiently from their investment in research.

The infrastructures and services they comprise can be thought of as supporting a common set of curation activities, at different levels of scale – institutional, national and international. Disciplinary domains and research questions cut across these, development resources are scarce, and the relationships between the actors involved in developing e-infrastructures are complex. So good conceptual tools are needed, whether to participate in these developments, evaluate their progress, guide researchers to make good use of the results, or critically engage with the very idea of data being usable ‘any time, any place’.

This chapter aims to describe how research data infrastructures are currently conceived and surveys recent developments. The chapter has three main sections, which aim to do the following:

  • Review the context for developing ‘research e-infrastructure’ and the problems these are intended to address. The first section then considers concepts of infrastructure and how these apply to research data, identifying data management and curation services that would utilize and sustain these data infrastructures.

  • Summarize recent action to co-ordinate research data management and curation services and infrastructure. This second section considers action on the international level by the European Union (EU) then, on the national level, by funding organizations in the UK, Netherlands and Germany. It then identifies initiatives at the level of educational institutions, focusing on the UK.

  • The final section of the chapter considers issues likely to affect the continued evolution of research data infrastructures.

  • Type
    Chapter
    Information
    Managing Research Data
    , pp. 205 - 234
    Publisher: Facet
    Print publication year: 2012

    Access options

    Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

    Save book to Kindle

    To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

    Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

    Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

    Available formats
    ×

    Save book to Dropbox

    To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

    Available formats
    ×

    Save book to Google Drive

    To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

    Available formats
    ×