Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-pcn4s Total loading time: 0.307 Render date: 2022-05-16T23:05:42.074Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

5 - Data management plans and planning

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 June 2018

Martin Donnelly
Affiliation:
Digital Curation Centre
Get access

Summary

Introduction

I tell this story to illustrate the truth of the statement I heard long ago in the Army: plans are worthless, but planning is everything.

Dwight D. Eisenhower

Research funders place increasing importance on data management planning as a mechanism for improving the longevity of research data and for enabling its widespread access and reuse. As explained in Chapter 3, the majority of public research funders in the UK ask that all grant applicants include a plan covering such aspects of data management as preservation, curation and future reuse, as appropriate to the needs of their scholarly domain.

This chapter discusses the various factors that have led to the upsurge of interest in data management planning, outlines the components that commonly make up a data management plan, and provides examples of tools and other resources that can help researchers and research support staff embarking on the round of planning activities.

Planning can be a misunderstood and underappreciated endeavour. At its heart, the purpose of planning is to make things better, to anticipate and make provision against risks, and to help communicate these preparations and agreements. But while plans may help to protect against under-performance, crucially they stop short of ensuring a good one. Specifically, in the case of data management plans they do not guarantee or deliver good data management practice; but they do serve to mitigate risks and help instil confidence and trust in the data and its stewards.

Planning is no stranger to the world of electronic data. Preservation planning is a function of the Open Archival Information System Reference Model (CCSDS, 2002), an influential framework for long-term preservation systems. It is also a stage in the Digital Curation Centre (DCC) Curation Lifecycle Model (Higgins, 2008), as explored in detail in Chapter 2. Data management is a facet of digital preservation, which is itself a facet of digital curation; so a data management plan will fit into a policy suite, matrix or framework alongside, inter alia, operational procedures, policies and risk registers. Consequently, data management planning can be considered a component of preservation planning, just as preservation planning can be considered a component of data management planning.

Type
Chapter
Information
Managing Research Data
, pp. 83 - 104
Publisher: Facet
Print publication year: 2012

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×