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3.01 Appendix - Optimal Antipsychotic Plasma Concentration Ranges [–]

from Appendices

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 October 2021

Michael Cummings
Affiliation:
University of California, Los Angeles
Stephen Stahl
Affiliation:
University of California, San Diego
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

Meyer, J. M. (2014). A rational approach to employing high plasma levels of antipsychotics for violence associated with schizophrenia: case vignettes. CNS Spectr, 19, 432438.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Meyer, J. M., Cummings, M. A., Proctor, G., et al. (2016). Psychopharmacology of persistent violence and aggression. Psychiatr Clin North Am, 39, 541556.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Meyer, J. M. (2018). Pharmacotherapy of psychosis and mania. In Gilman: The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics (eds.). New York: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
Schoretsanitis, G., Kane, J. M., Correll, C. U., et al. (2020). Blood levels to optimize antipsychotic treatment in clinical practice: a joint consensus statement of the American Society of Clinical Psychopharmacology and the Therapeutic Drug Monitoring Task Force of the Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Neuropsychopharmakologie und Pharmakopsychiatrie. J Clin Psychiatry, 81(3), 19cs13169.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

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