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3.10 Appendix - Medications That Present Risk for Serotonin Syndrome When Combined with Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitor [–]

from Appendices

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 October 2021

Michael Cummings
Affiliation:
University of California, Los Angeles
Stephen Stahl
Affiliation:
University of California, San Diego
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

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Meyer, J. M. (2018). A concise guide to monoamine oxidase inhibitors: part 2. Current Psychiatry, 17, 2233.Google Scholar
Meyer, J. M. (2018). Gilman: The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics. Pharmacotherapy of Psychosis and Mania. New York: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
Meyer, J. M. (2018). Pharmacotherapy of psychosis and mania. In Brunton, L. L., Hilal-Dandan, R., Knollmann, B. C. (eds.). Goodman & Gilman’s The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 13th ed. Chicago, IL: McGraw-Hill, pp. 279302.Google Scholar

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