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First-Generation (Typical) Antipsychotics

from Part II - Medication Reference Tables

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 October 2021

Michael Cummings
Affiliation:
University of California, Los Angeles
Stephen Stahl
Affiliation:
University of California, San Diego
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

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Meyer, J. M. (2018). Pharmacotherapy of psychosis and mania. In Brunton, L. L., Hilal-Dandan, R. and Knollmann, B. C. (eds.). Goodman & Gilman’s The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 13th ed. Chicago, IL: McGraw-Hill, pp. 279302.Google Scholar
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