Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-45s75 Total loading time: 0.32 Render date: 2021-11-30T19:24:32.803Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

18 - Magnetic resonance spectroscopy in stroke

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 August 2009

Stephen Davis
Affiliation:
Royal Melbourne Hospital and University of Melbourne
Marc Fisher
Affiliation:
National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland
Steven Warach
Affiliation:
National Institutes of Health, Baltimore
Get access

Summary

Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a non-invasive method that allows the in vivo investigation of biochemical changes in both animals and humans. The application of MRS to the study of stroke has made possible dynamic studies of intracellular metabolism in cerebral ischemia. The concentration of cerebral metabolites in the brain is very low (2-20 mM) compared to that of water (41.7 M of water or 83.4 M of protons). The evoked nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal from the metabolite is therefore very much smaller than the signal from water used to generate an anatomical display in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Hence, the minimum voxel size required for MRS is larger and data acquisition times are longer than in MRI. MRS is more sensitive to local magnetic field inhomogeneities leading to difficulties in the quantitation of peak areas. MRS has therefore been limited to use as a research tool, until the last few years. Despite the relatively low signal-to-noise ratio of spectroscopy, improvements in magnet and gradient design, and the wider availability of magnets at higher field strength (1.5T), now enable good quality brain [1H]-MRS spectra to be recorded on most modern clinical instruments.

The original spectroscopy work in animals and humans was carried out using phosphorus [31P] MRS. However, not all metabolites contain phosphorus, and the MR application of this nucleus has been restricted to the study of energy and lipid metabolism.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2003

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×