Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-z9m8x Total loading time: 0.378 Render date: 2022-09-29T02:58:55.695Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

4 - Relevance of human rights in the glocal space of politics: how to enlarge democratic practice beyond state boundaries and build up a peaceful world order

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 October 2011

Koen De Feyter
Affiliation:
Universiteit Antwerpen, Belgium
Stephan Parmentier
Affiliation:
Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium
Christiane Timmerman
Affiliation:
Universiteit Antwerpen, Belgium
George Ulrich
Affiliation:
Riga Graduate School of Law
Get access

Summary

Local governments for a fruitful sharing of the ‘responsibility to protect’ within a multilevel scheme of governance

A more visible and effective role for local governments in the international arena is indispensable in order to reverse the dramatic regression of international politics in the past two or three decades, marked by the orgy of deregulation, unilateralism, rearmament and ‘easy wars’. At this schizophrenic moment of history, when a handful of powerful leaderships, even if in response to terroristic behaviour and economic or financial failures, are attempting to push back to the Westphalian era the ‘new’ international law that has been developing since the adoption of the United Nations Charter and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, it is absolutely necessary to foster and nurture the virtuous strategic alliance between the genuine protagonists of a human-centric peaceful change pursued on a glocal scale: I refer to local governments (municipalities, regions, Länder) and transnational social movements.

While celebrating the sixtieth anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, we can all see that the planet is certainly more interdependent and globalised than in 1948. It only increases the need for having multilateral institutions capable of ‘deciding’ and carrying out international public policies for the equitable distribution and the transparent running of global public goods, including peace, security, development and the environment. Historical circumstances, should they be honestly interpreted with regard to the real needs of people all over the world, do advocate the strengthening of the United Nations, together with that ‘new’ law for which the UN exists, the international law of human rights. It should be emphasised that the UN and international legality share the same destiny.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

MacLean, GThe Changing Perception of Human Security: Coordinating National and Multilateral Responses – The United Nations and the New Security AgendaOttawaUNAC 1998Google Scholar
Musch, A.van der Valk, Ch.Sizoo, ATajbaksh, K.City Diplomacy. The Role of Local Governments in Conflict Prevention, Peace-Building, Post-conflict ResolutionThe HagueVNG International 2008Google Scholar
Papisca, A.‘Article 51 of the United Nations Charter: Exception or General Rule? The Nightmare of the Easy War’ 2005 Pace diritti umani/Peace Human Rights 1 13
Papisca, A.Citizenship and Citizenships : A Human Rights ApproachBekemans, L.Karasinska-Fendler, M.M. Mascia, A.Papisca, C.A.Stephanou, Xuereb, P.G.Intercultural Dialogue and Citizenship. Translating Values into Actions. A Common Project for Europeans and Their PartnersVeniceMarsilio 2007 457Google Scholar
1
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×