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7 - Raman amplifiers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 May 2011

Malin Premaratne
Affiliation:
Monash University, Victoria
Govind P. Agrawal
Affiliation:
University of Rochester, New York
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Summary

Light gets scattered when it encounters an obstacle or inhomogeneity even on a microscopic scale. A well-known example is the blue color of the sky, resulting from Rayleigh scattering of light by molecules in the air. Such redirection of energy can be used to amplify signals by taking power from a “pump” wave co-propagating with the signal in an appropriate optical medium. An example of this is provided by Raman scattering. Having said that, it is important to realize that scattering does not always occur when light interacts with a material [1]. In some cases, photons get absorbed in the medium, and their energy is eventually dissipated as heat. In other cases, the absorbed light may be re-emitted after a relatively short time delay in the form of a less energetic photon [2], a process known as fluorescence. If fluorescence takes place after a considerable delay, the same process is called phosphorescence [3].

For a photon to get absorbed by a material, its energy must correspond to the energy required by the atoms or molecules of that material to make a transition from one energy level to a higher energy level. In contrast, the scattering of photons from a material can take place without such a requirement. However, if the energy of the incident photon is close to an allowed energy transition, significant enhancement of scattering can occur.

Type
Chapter
Information
Light Propagation in Gain Media
Optical Amplifiers
, pp. 173 - 207
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2011

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  • Raman amplifiers
  • Malin Premaratne, Monash University, Victoria, Govind P. Agrawal, University of Rochester, New York
  • Book: Light Propagation in Gain Media
  • Online publication: 03 May 2011
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511973635.008
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  • Raman amplifiers
  • Malin Premaratne, Monash University, Victoria, Govind P. Agrawal, University of Rochester, New York
  • Book: Light Propagation in Gain Media
  • Online publication: 03 May 2011
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511973635.008
Available formats
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Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Raman amplifiers
  • Malin Premaratne, Monash University, Victoria, Govind P. Agrawal, University of Rochester, New York
  • Book: Light Propagation in Gain Media
  • Online publication: 03 May 2011
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511973635.008
Available formats
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