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Preface

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 May 2011

Malin Premaratne
Affiliation:
Monash University, Victoria
Govind P. Agrawal
Affiliation:
University of Rochester, New York
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Summary

Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler

–Albert Einstein

An optical fiber amplifier is a key component for enabling efficient transmission of wavelength-division multiplexed (WDM) signals over long distances. Even though many alternative technologies were available, erbium-doped fiber amplifiers won the race during the early 1990s and became a standard component for long-haul optical telecommunications systems. However, owing to the recent success in producing low-cost, high-power, semiconductor lasers operating near 1450 nm, the Raman amplifier technology has also gained prominence in the deployment of modern light-wave systems. Moreover, because of the push for integrated optoelectronic circuits, semiconductor optical amplifiers, rare-earth-doped planar waveguide amplifiers, and silicon optical amplifiers are also gaining much interest these days.

Interestingly, even though completely unrelated to the conventional optical communications technology, optical amplifiers are also finding applications in biomedical technology either as power boosters or signal-processing elements. Light is increasingly used as a tool for stretching, rotating, moving, or imaging cells in biological media. The so-called lab-on-chip devices are likely to integrate elements that are both acoustically and optically active, or use optical excitation for sensing and calibrating tasks. Most importantly, these new chips will have optical elements that can be broadly used for processing different forms of signals.

There are many excellent books that cover selective aspects of active optical devices including optical amplifiers. This book is not intended to replace these books but to complement them.

Type
Chapter
Information
Light Propagation in Gain Media
Optical Amplifiers
, pp. xi - xiv
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2011

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  • Preface
  • Malin Premaratne, Monash University, Victoria, Govind P. Agrawal, University of Rochester, New York
  • Book: Light Propagation in Gain Media
  • Online publication: 03 May 2011
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511973635.001
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  • Preface
  • Malin Premaratne, Monash University, Victoria, Govind P. Agrawal, University of Rochester, New York
  • Book: Light Propagation in Gain Media
  • Online publication: 03 May 2011
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511973635.001
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Preface
  • Malin Premaratne, Monash University, Victoria, Govind P. Agrawal, University of Rochester, New York
  • Book: Light Propagation in Gain Media
  • Online publication: 03 May 2011
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511973635.001
Available formats
×