Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5c569c448b-ckh7h Total loading time: 0.735 Render date: 2022-07-01T16:25:58.770Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

10 - Individual Differences and Good Language Teachers

from Part II - Classroom Perspectives

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 April 2020

Carol Griffiths
Affiliation:
University of Leeds
Zia Tajeddin
Affiliation:
Tarbiat Modares University, Iran
Get access

Summary

Chapter 10 outlines affective, cognitive, and social dimensions of individual differences in language learning and discusses language teachers’ insufficient expertise to match instruction to these differences. This outline is followed by a report on the findings from a small-scale study that explored teachers’ perceptions and use of individual learner differences in their classes.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Baddeley, A. (2007). Working memory, thought, and action. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Biedroń, A., & Pawlak, M. (2016). The interface between research on individual difference variables and teaching practice: The case of cognitive factors and personality. Studies in Second Language Learning and Teaching, 6(3), 395422.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Carroll, J. (1981). Twenty-five years of research on foreign language aptitude. In Diller, K. C. (Ed.), Individual differences and universals in language learning aptitude (pp. 83118). Rowley, MA: Newbury House.Google Scholar
Cohen, A. (2010). Focus on the language learner: Styles, strategies and motivation. In Schmitt, N. (Ed.), An introduction to applied linguistics (2nd ed.) (pp. 161178). London: Hodder Education.Google Scholar
Cohen, A. (2014). Strategies in learning and using a second language (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Csizér, K. (2017). Motivation in the L2 classroom. In Loewen, S. & Sato, M. (Eds.), The Routledge handbook of instructed second language acquisition (pp. 418432). New York, NY: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
DeKeyser, R. (2014). Age effects in second language learning. In Gass, S. M. & Mackey, A. (Eds.), The Routledge handbook of second language acquisition (pp. 442460). New York, NY: Routledge.Google Scholar
Dörnyei, Z. (2005). The psychology of the language learner: Individual differences in second language acquisition. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Dörnyei, Z. (2009). The L2 motivational self system. In Dörnyei, Z. & Ushioda, E. (Eds.), Motivation, language identity, and the self (pp. 942). Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dörnyei, Z., & Ryan, S. (2015). The psychology of the language learner revisited. New York, NY: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ellis, R. (2008). The study of second language acquisition. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Gardner, H. (2011). Frames of mind: The theory of multiple intelligences (3rd ed.). New York, NY: Basic Books.Google Scholar
Green, J., & Oxford, R. (1995). A closer look at learning strategies, L2 proficiency, and gender. TESOL Quarterly, 29(2), 261297.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gregersen, T., & MacIntyre, P. (2014). Capitalizing on language learners’ individuality: From premise to practice. Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Griffiths, C. (2012). Learning styles: Traversing the quagmire. In Mercer, S., Ryan, S., & Williams, M. (Eds.), Psychology for language learning (pp. 151168). New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Griffiths, C. (2018). The strategy factor in successful language learning: The tornado effect (2nd ed.). Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Griffiths, C., & Inceçay, G. (2016). Styles and style-stretching: How are they related to successful learning? Journal of Psycholinguistic Research, 45(3), 599613.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gu, P. (2002). Gender, academic major, and vocabulary learning strategies of Chinese EFL learners. RELC Journal, 33(1), 3554.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kalaja, P., & Barcelos, A. (Eds.). (2003). Beliefs about SLA: New research approaches. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Kluwer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Li, S. (2017). Cognitive differences in ISLA. In Loewen, S. & Sato, M. (Eds.), The Routledge handbook of instructed second language acquisition (pp. 396417). New York, NY: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
MacIntyre, P. (2007). Willingness to communicate in the second language: Understanding the decision to speak as a volitional process. Modern Language Journal, 91(4), 564576.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McCrea, R., & Costa, P. (2003). Personality in adulthood: A five-factor theory perspective (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Guilford Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mystkowska-Wiertelak, A., & Pawlak, M. (2017). Willingness to communicate in instructed second language acquisition: Combining a macro- and micro-perspective. Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nyikos, M. (2008). Gender and good language learners. In Griffiths, C. (Ed.), Lessons from good language learners (pp. 7382). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Oxford, R. (1993). Style analysis survey. Tuscaloosa, AL: University of Alabama.Google Scholar
Oxford, R. (2017). Teaching and researching language learning strategies: Self-regulation in context. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Oxford, R., Nyikos, M., & Ehrman, M. (1988). Vive la différence? Reflections on sex differences in use of language learning strategies. Foreign Language Annals, 21(4), 321329.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pawlak, M. (2012a). Individual differences in language learning and teaching: Achievements, prospects and challenges. In Pawlak, M. (Ed.), New perspectives on individual differences in language learning and teaching (pp. xixxlvi). Heidelberg: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pawlak, M. (2012b). The dynamic nature of motivation in language learning: A classroom perspective. Studies in Second Language Learning and Teaching, 2(2), 249278.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pawlak, M. (2017). Overview of learner individual differences and their mediating effects on the process and outcome of interaction. In Gurzynski-Weiss, L. (Ed.), Expanding individual difference research in the interaction approach: Investigating learners, instructors, and other interlocutors (pp. 1940). Amsterdam: John Benjamins.Google Scholar
Pawlak, M., Mystkowska-Wiertelak, A., & Bielak, J. (2016). Investigating the nature of classroom WTC: A micro-perspective. Language Teaching Research, 20(5), 654671.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pfenninger, S., & Singleton, D. (2017). Beyond age effects in instructional L2 learning: Revisiting the age factor. Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
Plomin, R., & Deary, J. (2015). Genetics and intelligence differences: Five special findings. Molecular Psychiatry, 20(1), 98108.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Robinson, P. (2002). Learning conditions, aptitude complexes and SLA: A framework for research and pedagogy. In Robinson, P. (Ed.), Individual differences and instructed language learning (pp. 113133). Philadelphia, PA: John Benjamins.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Skehan, P. (1998). A cognitive approach to language learning. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Sternberg, R. (2002). The theory of successful intelligence and its implications for language aptitude testing. In Robinson, P. (Ed.), Individual differences and instructed language learning (pp. 1343). Philadelphia, PA: John Benjamins.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ushioda, E., & Dörnyei, Z. (2014). Motivation. In Gass, S. M. & Mackey, A. (Eds.), The Routledge handbook of second language acquisition (pp. 396409). London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Williams, M., Mercer, S., & Ryan, S. (2015). Exploring psychology in language learning and teaching. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
3
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×