Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-7f7b94f6bd-vvt5l Total loading time: 1.179 Render date: 2022-06-28T16:43:41.446Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Part II - Classroom Perspectives

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 April 2020

Carol Griffiths
Affiliation:
University of Leeds
Zia Tajeddin
Affiliation:
Tarbiat Modares University, Iran
Get access

Summary

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Allwright, D. (1991). The death of method. CRILE Working Paper 10. Lancaster, UK: Lancaster University.Google Scholar
Asher, J. (1969). The total physical response approach to second language learning. The Modern Language Journal, 53(1), 317.Google Scholar
Brown, D. (2002). English language teaching in the “Post-Method” era: Towards better diagnosis, treatment, and assessment. In Richards, J. C. & Renandya, W. (Eds.), Methodology in language teaching (pp. 918). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chamot, A. (2004). Issues in language learning strategy research and teaching. Electronic Journal of Foreign Language Teaching, 2004, 1(1), 1426.Google Scholar
Curran, C. A. (1976). Counseling-learning in second languages. Apple River, Ill.: Apple River Press.Google Scholar
Dörnyei, Z. (2014). Researching complex dynamic systems: “Retrodictive qualitative modelling” in the language classroom. Language Teaching, 47(1), 8091.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ellis, G., & Sinclair, B. (1989). Learning to learn. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Ellis, R. (2003). Task-based language teaching and learning. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Gattegno, C. (1963). Teaching foreign languages in schools: The silent way. Reading, UK: Educational Explorers.Google Scholar
Gouin, F. (1896). The art of teaching and studying language. London: G. Philip & Son.Google Scholar
Griffiths, C. (2008). Teaching/learning method and good language learners. In Griffiths, C. (Ed.), Lessons from good language learners (pp. 255265). Cambridge: Cambridge University PressCrossRefGoogle Scholar
Griffiths, C. (2018). The strategy factor in successful language learning (2nd ed.). Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Halliday, M. (1977). Explorations in the functions of language. New York, NY: Elsevier North-Holland.Google Scholar
Heyer, S. (2004). All new easy true stories: A picture-based beginning reader. White Plains, NY: Longman.Google Scholar
Hockly, N. (2011). The digital generation. ELT Journal, 65(3), 322325.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hockly, N. (2017). One-to-one computer initiatives. ELT Journal, 71(1), 8086.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hymes, D. (1972). On communicative competence. In Pride, J. B. & Holmes, J. (Eds.), Sociolinguistics. Selected readings (pp. 269293). Harmondsworth, UK: Penguin.Google Scholar
Krashen, S., & Terrell, T. (1983). The natural approach. Hayward, CA: Hayward Press.Google Scholar
Kumaravadivelu, B. (1994). The postmethod condition: (E)merging strategies for second/foreign language teaching. TESOL Quarterly, 28(1), 2748.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kumaravadivelu, B. (2006). Understanding language teaching from method to postmethod. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Larsen-Freeman, D. (2000). Techniques and principles of language teaching. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Lewis, G. (2017). Learning technology. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Littlewood, W. (1981). Communicative language teaching: An introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Lozanov, G. (1978). Suggestology and outlines of suggestopedy. New York, NY: Gordon & Breach.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nunan, D. (1987). Syllabus design. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Nunan, D. (1988). The learner-centred curriculum. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nunan, D. (2004). Task-based language teaching. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
O’Malley, M., & Chamot, A. (1990). Learning strategies in second language acquisition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Oxford, R. (1990). Language learning strategies: What every teacher should know. New York, NY: Newbury House.Google Scholar
Pawlak, M. (2020). Grammar and good language teachers. In Griffiths, C. & Tajeddin, Z. (Eds.), Lessons from good language teachers (pp. 219–231). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Psaltou-Joycey, A. (2020). Language learning strategies and good language teachers. In Griffiths, C. & Tajeddin, Z. (Eds.), Lessons from good language teachers (pp. 175–186). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Ray, B. (1990). Look, I can talk English. Los Gatos, CA: Sky Oak Production.Google Scholar
Rayan, A. (n.d.). What are the characteristics of a successful teacher of English? British Council. Retrieved from: www.teachingenglish.org.uk/blogs/albertrayan/characteristics-highly-effective-teachers-english.Google Scholar
Richards, J. C., & Rodgers, T. S. (1982). Method: Approach, design, and procedure. TESOL Quarterly, 16(2), 153168.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Richards, J. C., & Rodgers, T. (2014). Approaches and methods in language teaching (3rd ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Rocha, V., & Coutinho, C. (2015). Assessing pedagogical dimensions of an educational app: A tool for teachers and educators. In Garbett, D. & Ovens, A. (Eds.), Teaching for tomorrow today (pp. 123132). Auckland: EDIFY LTD.Google Scholar
Scharle, A., & Szabo, A. (2000). Learner autonomy: A guide to developing learner responsibility. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Scholz, K., & Schulze, M. (2017). Digital-gaming trajectories and second language development. Language Learning & Technology, 21(1), 100120. Retrieved from: www.lltjournal.org/item/2987.Google Scholar
Sorcinelli, M. D. (1986). Teaching academic career paths: Implications for faculty development. To Improve the Academy 5, 169181. Retrieved from: http://teachingandlearning.illinois.edu/pdf/Sorcinelli_Observation_Guide.pdf.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tajeddin, Z. (2005). A critique of the inception and premises of the postmethod paradigm. ILI Language Teaching Journal, 1(1), 114.Google Scholar
Thornbury, S. (1996). Teachers research teacher talk. ELT Journal, 50(4), 279288.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Thornbury, S. (1999). How to teach grammar. Harlow, UK: Longman.Google Scholar
Thornbury, S. (2002). How to teach vocabulary. Harlow, UK: LongmanGoogle Scholar
Weimer, M. (1991). Improving college teaching, strategies for developing instructional effectiveness. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass PublishersGoogle Scholar
Wilkins, D. (1976). Notional syllabuses. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
ALTE. (2002). The ALTE can do project. Cambridge: Association of Language Testers in Europe. Retrieved from: www.cambridgeenglish.org/images/28906-alte-can-do-document.pdf.Google Scholar
Brown, J. D., & Hudson, T. (1998). The alternatives in language assessment: Advantages and disadvantages. TESOL Quarterly, 32(4), 653675.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Carless, D. (2015). Exploring learning-oriented assessment processes. Higher Education, 69(6), 963976.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cheng, L., & Fox, J. (2017). Assessment in the language classroom. London: Palgrave.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Creswell, J. (2014). Research design: Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches (4th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
Douglas, D. (2010). Understanding language testing. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Farrell, T., & Mom, V. (2015). Exploring teacher questions through reflective practice. Reflective Practice, 16(6), 849866.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hamp-Lyons, L., & Condon, W. (2000). Assessing the portfolio: Principles for practice, theory, and research. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press.Google Scholar
Johnson, K. (2009). Second language teacher education: A sociocultural perspective. New York, NY: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Katz, A. (2014). Assessment in second language classroom. In Celce-Murcia, M., Brinton, D., & Snow, M. (Eds.), Teaching English as a second or foreign language (pp. 320337). Boston, MA: National Geographic Learning.Google Scholar
Lim, H. (2007). A study of self- and peer-assessment of learners’ oral proficiency. In Hilton, N., Arscott, R., Barden, K., Krishna, A., Shah, S., & Zellers, M. (Eds.), Proceedings for the Fifth Cambridge Postgraduate Conference in Linguistics (pp. 169176). Cambridge: Cambridge Institute of Language Research.Google Scholar
Little, D., & Erickson, G. (2015). Learner identity, learner agency, and the assessment of language proficiency: Some reflections prompted by the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. Annual Review of Applied Linguistics, 35, 120139.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Norris, J. (2016). Current uses for task-based language assessment. Annual Review of Applied Linguistics, 36, 230244.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stiggins, R. (1995). Assessment literacy for the 21st century. Phi Delta Kappan, 77(3), 238245.Google Scholar
Turner, C., & Purpura, J. (2015). Learning-oriented assessment in the classroom. In Tsagari, D. & Banerjee, J. (Eds.), Handbook of second language assessment (pp. 255272). Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton.Google Scholar
Weir, C. (2013). An overview of the influences on English language testing in the United Kingdom 1913–2012. In Weir, C., Vidakovic, I., & Galaczi, D. (Eds.), A history of Cambridge English examinations (pp. 1102). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Baddeley, A. (2007). Working memory, thought, and action. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Biedroń, A., & Pawlak, M. (2016). The interface between research on individual difference variables and teaching practice: The case of cognitive factors and personality. Studies in Second Language Learning and Teaching, 6(3), 395422.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Carroll, J. (1981). Twenty-five years of research on foreign language aptitude. In Diller, K. C. (Ed.), Individual differences and universals in language learning aptitude (pp. 83118). Rowley, MA: Newbury House.Google Scholar
Cohen, A. (2010). Focus on the language learner: Styles, strategies and motivation. In Schmitt, N. (Ed.), An introduction to applied linguistics (2nd ed.) (pp. 161178). London: Hodder Education.Google Scholar
Cohen, A. (2014). Strategies in learning and using a second language (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Csizér, K. (2017). Motivation in the L2 classroom. In Loewen, S. & Sato, M. (Eds.), The Routledge handbook of instructed second language acquisition (pp. 418432). New York, NY: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
DeKeyser, R. (2014). Age effects in second language learning. In Gass, S. M. & Mackey, A. (Eds.), The Routledge handbook of second language acquisition (pp. 442460). New York, NY: Routledge.Google Scholar
Dörnyei, Z. (2005). The psychology of the language learner: Individual differences in second language acquisition. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Dörnyei, Z. (2009). The L2 motivational self system. In Dörnyei, Z. & Ushioda, E. (Eds.), Motivation, language identity, and the self (pp. 942). Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dörnyei, Z., & Ryan, S. (2015). The psychology of the language learner revisited. New York, NY: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ellis, R. (2008). The study of second language acquisition. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Gardner, H. (2011). Frames of mind: The theory of multiple intelligences (3rd ed.). New York, NY: Basic Books.Google Scholar
Green, J., & Oxford, R. (1995). A closer look at learning strategies, L2 proficiency, and gender. TESOL Quarterly, 29(2), 261297.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gregersen, T., & MacIntyre, P. (2014). Capitalizing on language learners’ individuality: From premise to practice. Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Griffiths, C. (2012). Learning styles: Traversing the quagmire. In Mercer, S., Ryan, S., & Williams, M. (Eds.), Psychology for language learning (pp. 151168). New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Griffiths, C. (2018). The strategy factor in successful language learning: The tornado effect (2nd ed.). Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Griffiths, C., & Inceçay, G. (2016). Styles and style-stretching: How are they related to successful learning? Journal of Psycholinguistic Research, 45(3), 599613.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gu, P. (2002). Gender, academic major, and vocabulary learning strategies of Chinese EFL learners. RELC Journal, 33(1), 3554.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kalaja, P., & Barcelos, A. (Eds.). (2003). Beliefs about SLA: New research approaches. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Kluwer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Li, S. (2017). Cognitive differences in ISLA. In Loewen, S. & Sato, M. (Eds.), The Routledge handbook of instructed second language acquisition (pp. 396417). New York, NY: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
MacIntyre, P. (2007). Willingness to communicate in the second language: Understanding the decision to speak as a volitional process. Modern Language Journal, 91(4), 564576.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McCrea, R., & Costa, P. (2003). Personality in adulthood: A five-factor theory perspective (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Guilford Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mystkowska-Wiertelak, A., & Pawlak, M. (2017). Willingness to communicate in instructed second language acquisition: Combining a macro- and micro-perspective. Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nyikos, M. (2008). Gender and good language learners. In Griffiths, C. (Ed.), Lessons from good language learners (pp. 7382). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Oxford, R. (1993). Style analysis survey. Tuscaloosa, AL: University of Alabama.Google Scholar
Oxford, R. (2017). Teaching and researching language learning strategies: Self-regulation in context. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Oxford, R., Nyikos, M., & Ehrman, M. (1988). Vive la différence? Reflections on sex differences in use of language learning strategies. Foreign Language Annals, 21(4), 321329.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pawlak, M. (2012a). Individual differences in language learning and teaching: Achievements, prospects and challenges. In Pawlak, M. (Ed.), New perspectives on individual differences in language learning and teaching (pp. xixxlvi). Heidelberg: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pawlak, M. (2012b). The dynamic nature of motivation in language learning: A classroom perspective. Studies in Second Language Learning and Teaching, 2(2), 249278.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pawlak, M. (2017). Overview of learner individual differences and their mediating effects on the process and outcome of interaction. In Gurzynski-Weiss, L. (Ed.), Expanding individual difference research in the interaction approach: Investigating learners, instructors, and other interlocutors (pp. 1940). Amsterdam: John Benjamins.Google Scholar
Pawlak, M., Mystkowska-Wiertelak, A., & Bielak, J. (2016). Investigating the nature of classroom WTC: A micro-perspective. Language Teaching Research, 20(5), 654671.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pfenninger, S., & Singleton, D. (2017). Beyond age effects in instructional L2 learning: Revisiting the age factor. Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
Plomin, R., & Deary, J. (2015). Genetics and intelligence differences: Five special findings. Molecular Psychiatry, 20(1), 98108.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Robinson, P. (2002). Learning conditions, aptitude complexes and SLA: A framework for research and pedagogy. In Robinson, P. (Ed.), Individual differences and instructed language learning (pp. 113133). Philadelphia, PA: John Benjamins.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Skehan, P. (1998). A cognitive approach to language learning. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Sternberg, R. (2002). The theory of successful intelligence and its implications for language aptitude testing. In Robinson, P. (Ed.), Individual differences and instructed language learning (pp. 1343). Philadelphia, PA: John Benjamins.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ushioda, E., & Dörnyei, Z. (2014). Motivation. In Gass, S. M. & Mackey, A. (Eds.), The Routledge handbook of second language acquisition (pp. 396409). London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Williams, M., Mercer, S., & Ryan, S. (2015). Exploring psychology in language learning and teaching. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Alemi, M., & Tajeddin, Z. (2020). Reflection and good language teachers. In Griffiths, C. & Tajeddin, Z. (Eds.), Lessons from good language teachers (pp. 41–53). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Allwright, D. (2003). Brief guide to exploratory practice: Rethinking practitioner research in language teaching. Language Teaching Research, 7(2), 113141.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Allwright, D., & Bailey, K. M. (1991). Focus on the language classroom. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Babai Shishavan, H., & Sadeghi, K. (2009). Characteristics of an effective English language teacher as perceived by Iranian teachers and learners of English. English Language Teaching, 2(4), 130143.Google Scholar
Bernstein, B. (1996). Pedagogy, symbolic control and identity: Theory, research and critique. London: Taylor and Francis.Google Scholar
Bluestein, J. (2014). Managing 21st century classrooms: How do I avoid ineffective classroom management practices. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.Google Scholar
Bowers, C., & Flinders, D. (1990). Responsive teaching: An ecological approach to classroom patterns of language, culture and thought. New York, NY: Teachers College Press.Google Scholar
Brophy, J. (2011). Teaching educational practices series – 1. Geneva: International Academy of Education.Google Scholar
Brosh, H. (1996). Perceived characteristics of the effective language teacher. Foreign Language Annals, 29(2), 125136.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bruner, J. S. (1966). Towards a theory of instruction. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University.Google Scholar
Burnett, J. (2011). Two case studies of secondary language teaching: A critical look at the intersection of management and the local and social realities that shape our classrooms. The Modern Language Journal, 95(Supplement 1), 426.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cresswell, J. (2012). Educational research: Planning, conducting and evaluating quantitative and qualitative research (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.Google Scholar
Doyle, W. (2009). Situated practice: A reflection on person-centered classroom management. Theory into Practice, 48(2), 156159.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Evertson, C. M., & Weinstein, C. S. (Eds.). (2011). Handbook of classroom management: Research, practice and contemporary issues. New York, NY: Routledge.Google Scholar
Goker, S. (2006). Leading for learning: Reflective management in EFL schools. Theory into Practice, 45(2), 187196.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Griffiths, C., & Sönmez, G. (2020). Burnout and good language teachers. In Griffiths, C. & Tajeddin, Z. (Eds.), Lessons from good language teachers (pp. 80–92). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Hargreaves, A. (1994). Changing teachers, changing times. London: Cassell.Google Scholar
Hopkins, D., West, M., Ainscow, M., Harris, A., & Beresford, J. (1997). Creating the conditions for classroom improvement: A handbook of staff development activities. London: Fulton.Google Scholar
Ivanova, I. (2015). In-service EFL teachers’ problems, needs and expectations. Episkop Konstantinovi Cheteniya, 21, 128145.Google Scholar
Ivanova, I. (2016). The status of speaking and communication in EFL classroom. Episkop Konstantinovi Cheteniya, 22, 4553.Google Scholar
Joyce, B., Calhoun, E., & Hopkins, D. (1997). Models of teaching: Tools for learning. Buckingham, UK: Open University Press.Google Scholar
Martin, M., & Norwich, B. (1991). The integration of research findings on classroom management into a programme for use in teacher education. British Educational Research Journal, 17(4), 333351.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McCaslin, M., & Good, T. (1998). Moving beyond management as sheer compliance: Helping students to develop goal coordination strategies. Educational Horizons, 76, 169176.Google Scholar
Mercer, S., & Gkonou, C. (2020). Relationships and good language teachers. In Griffiths, C. & Tajeddin, Z. (Eds.), Lessons from good language teachers (pp.164–174). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Morgan, L. (2000). Class size and second-language instruction at the post-secondary level: A survey of the literature and a plea for further research. Italica, 77(4), 449472.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nassaji, H., & Kartchava, E. (2020). Corrective feedback and good language teachers. In Griffiths, C. & Tajeddin, Z. (Eds.), Lessons from good language teachers (pp. 151–163). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
OECD (2009). Creating effective teaching and learning environments: First results from TALIS. Paris: OECD.Google Scholar
OECD (2014). A teachers’ guide to TALIS 2013: Teaching and learning international survey. Paris: OECD.Google Scholar
Prodromou, L. (1991). The good language teacher. In Kral, T. (Ed.), Teacher development: Making the right moves. Washington, DC: English Language Programs Division.Google Scholar
Read, C. (2005). Managing children positively. English Teaching Professional, 38, 47.Google Scholar
Reese, J. (2007). The four Cs of successful classroom management. Music Educators Journal, 94(1), 2429.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Richards, J., & Lockhart, C. (1994). Reflective teaching in second language classrooms. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sarangi, S., & Roberts, C. (Eds). (1999). Talk, work and institutional order: Discourse in medical, mediation and management settings. The Hague: Mouton.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Scrivener, J. (2012). Classroom management techniques. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Scrivener, J., & Underhill, A. (n.d.) Demand high ELT. Retrieved from: www.demandhighelt.wordpress.com.Google Scholar
Tharp, R., & Gallimore, R. (1988). Rousing minds to life: Teaching, learning and schooling in a social context. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Tütüniş, B. (2020). Method, methodology, technological medium, and good language teachers. In Griffiths, C. & Tajeddin, Z. (Eds.), Lessons from good language teachers (pp. 95–106). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
van Manen, M. (1991). The tact of teaching. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.Google Scholar
Wells, G. (1999). Dialogic inquiry. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wiseman, D., & Hunt, G. (2008). Best practice in motivation and management in the classroom. Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas Publishers.Google Scholar
Wolk, S. (2002). Being good: Rethinking classroom management and student discipline. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.Google Scholar
Wright, T. (2005). Classroom management in language education. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ammar, A., & Spada, N. (2006). One size fits all?: Recasts, prompts, and L2 learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 28(4), 543574.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brown, D. (2016). The type and linguistic foci of oral corrective feedback in the L2 classroom: A meta-analysis. Language Teaching Research, 20(4), 436458.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ellis, R. (2006). Researching the effects of form-focussed instruction on L2 acquisition. AILA Review, 19, 1841.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ellis, R. (2015). Understanding second language acquisition (2nd ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Ellis, R. (2017). Oral corrective feedback in L2 classrooms: What we know so far. In Nassaji, H. & Kartchava, E. (Eds.), Corrective feedback in second language teaching and learning: research, theory, applications, implications (pp. 318). New York, NY: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ellis, R., Basturkmen, H., & Loewen, S. (2001). Learner uptake in communicative ESL lessons. Language Learning, 51(2), 281318.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fu, T., & Nassaji, H. (2016). Corrective feedback, learner uptake, and feedback perception in a Chinese as a foreign language classroom. Studies in Second Language Learning and Teaching, 6(1), 161183.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Goo, J., & Mackey, A. (2013). The case against the case against recasts. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 35(1), 127165.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Isaacs, T., & Trofimovich, P. (2012). Deconstructing comprehensibility: Identifying the linguistic influences on learners’ L2 comprehensibility ratings. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 34(3), 475505.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jean, G., & Simard., D. (2011). Grammar learning in English and French L2: Students’ and teachers’ beliefs and perceptions. Foreign Language Annals, 44(3), 467494.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kartchava, E. (2016). Learner beliefs about corrective feedback in the language classroom: Perspectives from two international contexts. TESL Canada Journal, 33(2), 1945.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kartchava, E., & Ammar, A. (2014a). The noticeability and effectiveness of corrective feedback in relation to target type. Language Teaching Research, 18(4), 428452.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kartchava, E., & Ammar, A. (2014b). Learners’ beliefs as mediators of what is noticed and learned in the language classroom. TESOL Quarterly, 48(1), 86109.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Li, S. (2010). The effectiveness of corrective feedback in SLA: A meta-analysis. Language Learning, 60(2), 309365.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Long, M. (2007). Problems in SLA. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Lyster, R. (1998). Negotiation of form, recasts, and explicit correction in relation to error types and learner repair in immersion classrooms. Language Learning, 48(2), 183218.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lyster, R. (2004). Differential effects of prompts and recasts in form-focused instruction. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 26(3), 399432.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lyster, R., & Ranta, L. (1997). Corrective feedback and learner uptake: Negotiation of form in communicative classrooms. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 19(1), 3766.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mackey, A., Gass, S. M., & McDonough, K. (2000). How do learners perceive implicit negative feedback? Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 22(4), 471497.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mackey, A., & Goo, J. (2007). Interaction research in SLA: A meta-analysis and research synthesis. In Mackey, A. (Ed.), Conversational interaction in second language acquisition: A collection of empirical studies (pp. 407452). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Nabei, T., & Swain, M. (2002). Learner awareness of recasts in classroom interaction: A case study of an adult EFL student’s second language learning. Language Awareness, 11(1), 4363.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nassaji, H. (2007). Elicitation and reformulation and their relationship with learner repair in dyadic interaction. Language Learning, 57(4), 511548.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nassaji, H. (2009). The effects of recasts and elicitations in dyadic interaction and the role of feedback explicitness. Language Learning, 59(2), 411452.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nassaji, H. (2011). Correcting student’s written grammatical errors: The effects of negotiated versus non-negotiated feedback. Studies in Second Language Learning and Teaching, 1(3), 315334.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nassaji, H. (2013). Participation structure and incidental focus on form in adult ESL classrooms. Language Learning, 63(4), 835869.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nassaji, H. (2015). Interactional feedback dimension in instructed second language learning. London: Bloomsbury Publishing.Google Scholar
Nassaji, H. (2016). Interactional feedback in second language teaching and learning: A synthesis and analysis of current research. Language Teaching Research, 20(4), 535562.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nassaji, H. (2017a). The effectiveness of extensive versus intensive recasts for learning L2 grammar. The Modern Language Journal, 101(2), 353368.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nassaji, H. (2017b). Negotiated oral feedback in response to written errors. In Nassaji, H. & Kartchava, E. (Eds.), Corrective feedback in second language teaching and learning: Research, theory, applications, implications (pp. 114128). New York, NY: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nassaji, H., & Kartchava, E. (Eds.). (2017a). Corrective feedback in second language teaching and learning: Research, theory, applications, implications. New York, NY: Routledge.Google Scholar
Nassaji, H., & Kartchava, E. (2017b). The role of corrective feedback: Theoretical and pedagogical perspectives. In Nassaji, H. & Kartchava, E. (Eds.), Corrective feedback in second language teaching and learning: Research, theory, applications, implications (pp. ix-xv). New York, NY: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nassaji, H., & Kartchava, E. (2017c). Conclusion, reflections, and final remarks. In Nassaji, H. & Kartchava, E. (Eds.), Corrective feedback in second language teaching and learning: Research, theory, applications, implications (pp. 174182). New York, NY: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nassaji, H., & Swain, M. (2000). A Vygotskian perspective on corrective feedback: The effect of random versus negotiated help on the learning of English articles. Language Awareness, 99(1), 3451.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nicholas, H., Lightbown, P. M., & Spada, N. (2001). Recasts as feedback to language learners. Language Learning, 51(4), 719758.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Panova, I., & Lyster, R. (2002). Patterns of corrective feedback and uptake in an adult ESL classroom. TESOL Quarterly, 36(4), 573595.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pawlak, M. (2020). Individual differences and good language teachers. In Griffiths, C. & Tajeddin, Z. (Eds.), Lessons from good language teachers (pp. 121–132). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Rahimi, M., Kushki, A., & Nassaji, H. (2015). Diagnostic and developmental potentials of dynamic assessment for L2 writing. Language and Sociocultural Theory, 2(2),185208.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schulz, R. A. (2001). Cultural differences in student and teacher perceptions concerning the role of grammar instruction and corrective feedback: USA – Colombia. The Modern Language Journal, 85(2), 244258.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Yang, Y., & Lyster, R. (2010). Effects of form-focused practice and feedback on Chinese EFL learners’ acquisition of regular and irregular past tense forms. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 32(2), 235263.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ziegler, N., & Mackey, A. (2017). Interactional feedback in computer-mediated communication: A review of the art. In Nassaji, H. & Kartchava, E. (Eds.), Corrective feedback in second language teaching and learning: Research, theory, applications, implications (pp. 8094). New York, NY: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Benesch, S. (2017). Emotions and English language teaching: Exploring teachers’ emotion labor. New York, NY: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bingham, C., & Sidorkin, A. M. (Eds). (2010). No education without relation. New York, NY: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
Brackett, M. A., Palomera, R., Mojsa-Kaja, J., Reyes, M. R., & Salovey, P. (2010). Emotion-regulation ability, burnout, and job satisfaction among British secondary-school teachers. Psychology in the Schools, 47(4), 406417.Google Scholar
Brooks, D. (2012). The social animal: A story of how success happens. London: Short Books.Google Scholar
Bryk, A. S., & Schneider, B. (2002). Trust in schools: A core resource for improvement. New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation.Google Scholar
Chan, D. W. (2006). Emotional intelligence and components of burnout among Chinese secondary school teachers in Hong Kong. Teaching and Teacher Education, 22(8), 10421054.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chang, M.-L., & Davis, H. A. (2009). Understanding the role of teacher appraisals in shaping the dynamics of their relationships with students: Deconstructing teachers’ judgements of disruptive behavior students. In Schutz, P. A. & Zembylas, M. (Eds.), Advances in teacher emotion research (pp. 95127). New York, NY: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cowie, N. (2011). Emotions that experienced English as a foreign language (EFL) teachers feel about their students, their colleagues and their work. Teaching and Teacher Education, 27(1), 235242.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Davis, H. A., Summers, J. J., & Miller, L. M. (2012). An interpersonal approach to classroom management. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.Google Scholar
Dresel, M., & Hall, N. (2013). Motivation. In Hall, N. & Götz, T. (Eds.), Emotion, motivation, and self-regulation: A handbook for teachers (pp. 57122). Bingley: Emerald.Google Scholar
Farrell, T. S. C. (2015). Reflecting on teacher-student relationships. ELT Journal, 69(1), 2634.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fredricks, J. A., Blumenfeld, P. C., & Paris, A. (2004). School engagement: Potential of the concept: State of the evidence. Review of Educational Research, 74(1), 59109.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Frenzel, A. C. (2014). Teacher emotions. In Pekrun, R. & Linnenbrink-Garcia, L. (Eds.), International handbook of emotions in education (pp. 494519). New York, NY: Routledge.Google Scholar
Frenzel, A. C., & Stephens, E. J. (2013). Emotions. In Hall, N. & Götz, T. (Eds.), Emotion, motivation, and self-regulation: A handbook for teachers (pp.156). Bingley: Emerald.Google Scholar
Frisby, B. N., & Martin, M. M. (2010). Instructor-student and student-student rapport in the classroom. Communication Education, 59(2), 146164.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Furrer, C. J., Skinner, E. A., & Pitzer, J. R. (2014). The influence of teacher and peer relationships on students’ classroom engagement and everyday motivational resilience. National Society for the Study of Education, 113(1), 101123.Google Scholar
Gkonou, C., & Mercer, S. (2017). Understanding emotional and social intelligence among English language teachers. ELT Research Papers 17(3). London: British Council.Google Scholar
Gordon, S., Benner, P., & Noddings, N. (1996). Caregiving: Readings in knowledge, practice, ethics, and politics. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press.Google Scholar
Hattie, J. (2009). Visible learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. Abingdon: Routledge.Google Scholar
Hochschild, A. (1983). The managed heart: Commercialization of human feelings. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.Google Scholar
Howe, D. (2013). Empathy: What it is and why it matters. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Huberman, A. M., & Vandenberghe, R. (1999). Introduction – Burnout and the teaching profession. In Vandenberghe, R. & Huberman, A. M. (Eds.), Understanding and preventing teacher burnout: A sourcebook of international research and practice (pp. 111). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Humphrey, N. (2013). Social and emotional learning: A critical appraisal. London: Sage.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Isenbarger, L., & Zembylas, M. (2006). The emotional labour of caring in teaching. Teaching and Teacher Education, 22(1), 120134.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
King, J. (2015). “It’s time, put on the smile, it’s time!”: The emotional labour of second language teaching within a Japanese university. In Gkonou, C., Tatzl, D., & Mercer, S. (Eds.), New directions in language learning psychology (pp. 97112). Cham: Springer.Google Scholar
Knight, J. (2016). Better conversations: Coaching ourselves and each other to be more credible, caring, and connected. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.Google Scholar
Krznaric, R. (2014). Empathy: A handbook for revolution. Croydon: Rider.Google Scholar
Marzano, R. J. (2003). Classroom management that works: Research-based strategies for every teacher. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.Google Scholar
Nguyen, H. T. (2007). Rapport building in language instruction: A microanalysis of the multiple resources in teacher talk. Language and Education, 21(4), 284303.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Noddings, N. (2013). Caring: A relational approach to ethics and moral education. Palo Alto, CA: University of California Press.Google Scholar
Reeve, J. (2006). Teachers as facilitators: What autonomy-supportive teachers do and why their students benefit. The Elementary School Journal, 106(3), 225236.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Roffey, S. (2011). Changing behaviour in schools: Promoting positive relationships and wellbeing. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
Rogers, C., & Freiberg, H. J. (1994). Freedom to learn. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.Google Scholar
Ruohotie-Lyhty, M., Korppi, A., Moate, J., & Nyman, T. (2018). Seeking understanding of foreign language teachers’ shifting emotions in relation to pupils. Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, 62(2), 272286.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Seligman, M. E. P. (2011). Flourish: A new understanding of happiness and wellbeing – and how to achieve them. London: Nicholas Brealey.Google Scholar
Spilt, J. L., Koomen, H. M. Y., & Thijs, J. T. (2011). Teacher wellbeing: The importance of teacher-student relationships. Educational Psychology Review, 23(4), 457477.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Todorova, R., & Ivanova, I. (2020). Classroom management and good language teachers. In Griffiths, C. & Tajeddin, Z. (Eds.), Lessons from good language teachers (pp. 133–150). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Tsang, K. K. (2011). Emotional labor of teaching. Educational Research, 2, 13121316.Google Scholar
Warren, A. (2014). ‘Relationships for me are the key for everything’: Early childhood teachers’ subjectivities as relational professionals. Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood, 15(3), 262271.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wentzel, K. R. (1997). Student motivation in middle school: The role of perceived pedagogical caring. Journal of Educational Psychology, 89(3), 411419.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wentzel, K. R. (2015). Teacher-student relationships, motivation, and competence at school. New York, NY: Routledge.Google Scholar
Wilcken, A. J., & Roseth, C. J. (2015). The importance of teacher-student relationships for student engagement and achievement. New York, NY: Routledge.Google Scholar
Wubbels, T., den Brok, P., van Tartwijk, J., & Levy, J. (Eds.). (2012). Interpersonal relationships in education: An overview of contemporary research. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Anderson, N. (2008). Metacognition and good language learners. In Griffiths, C. (Ed.), Lessons from good language learners (pp. 99109). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Babai Shishavan, H., & Sadeghi, K. (2009). Characteristics of an effective English language teacher as perceived by Iranian teachers and learners of English. English Language Teaching, 2(4), 130143.Google Scholar
Borg, S. (2006). The distinctive characteristics of foreign language teachers. Language Teaching Research, 10(1), 331.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chamot, A. U. (2008). Strategy instruction and good language learners. In Griffiths, C. (Ed.), Lessons from good language learners (pp. 266281). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chamot, A. U. (2009). The CALLA handbook: Implementing the cognitive academic language learning approach (2nd ed.). White Plains, NY: Pearson Education/Longman.Google Scholar
Chamot, A. U., Barnhardt, S., El-Dinary, P., & Robbins, J. (1999). Learning strategies handbook. White Plains, NY: Addison Wesley Longman.Google Scholar
Chamot, A., & Harris, V. (Eds.). (forthcoming). Learning strategy instruction in the language classroom: issues and implementation. Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
Cohen, A. (1998). Strategies in learning and using a second language (1st ed.). London: Longman.Google Scholar
Cohen, A. (2011). Strategies in learning and using a second language (2nd ed.). London: LongmanGoogle Scholar
Dewaele, J.-M., & MacIntyre, P. (2014). The two faces of Janus? Anxiety and enjoyment in the foreign language classroom. Studies in Second Language Learning and Teaching 4(2), 237274.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ehrman, M., & Dörnyei, Z. (1998). Interpersonal dynamics in second language education. London: Sage Publications.Google Scholar
Graham, S. (1997). Effective language learning: Positive strategies for advanced level language learning. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
Grenfell, M., & Harris, V. (1999). Modern languages and learning strategies in theory and practice. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Griffiths, C. (2008). Strategies and good language learners. In Griffiths, C. (Ed.), Lessons from good language learners (pp. 3548). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Griffiths, C. (2013). The strategy factor in successful language learning. Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Griffiths, C. (2018). The strategy factor in successful language learning: The Tornado Effect (2nd ed.). Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Griffiths, C., & Parr, J. M. (2001). Language learning strategies: Theory and perception. ELT Journal, 55(3), 247254.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Harris, V. (2001). Helping learners learn: Exploring strategy instruction in language classrooms across Europe. Strasbourg: Council of Europe Publishing.Google Scholar
Larsen-Freeman, D. (2001). Individual cognitive/affective learner contributions and differential success in second language acquisition. In Breen, M. P. (Ed.), Learner contributions to language learning: New directions in research (pp. 1224). Harlow, UK: Longman.Google Scholar
MacIntyre, P., & Mercer, S. (2014). Introducing positive psychology to SLA. Studies in Second Language Learning and Teaching, 4(2), 153172.Google Scholar
Mercer, S., & Gkonou, C. (2020). Relationships and good language teachers. In Griffiths, C. & Tajeddin, Z. (Eds.), Lessons from good language teachers (pp. 164–174). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Mullock, B. (2003). What makes a good teacher? The perceptions of postgraduate TESOL students. Prospect, 18(3), 324.Google Scholar
Nguyen, L. T. C. & Gu, P. Y. (2013). Strategy-based instruction: A learner-focused approach to developing learner autonomy. Language Teaching Research, 17(1), 930.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nunan, D. (1995). Closing the gap between learning and instruction. TESOL Quarterly, 29(1), 133158.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
O’Malley, J. M., & Chamot, A. U. (1990). Learning strategies in second language acquisition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Oxford, R. L. (1990). Language learning strategies: What every teacher should know. Boston, MA: Heinle & Heinle.Google Scholar
Oxford, R. L. (2011). Teaching and researching language learning strategies. Harlow, UK: Pearson Education.Google Scholar
Oxford, R. L. (2017). Teaching and researching language learning strategies: Self-regulation in context. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Oxford, R. L., Cho, Y., Leung, S., & Kim, H. (2004). Effect of the presence and difficulty of task on strategy use: An exploratory study. International Review of Applied Linguistics in Language Teaching, 42(1), 147.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Papadopoulou, I., Kantaridou, Z., Platsidou, M., & Agaliotis, I. (2017). Foreign language teachers’ strategy instruction practices in Greek lower secondary education. In Gavriilidou, Z., Petrogiannis, K., Platsidou, M., & Psaltou-Joycey, A. (Eds.), Language learning strategies: theoretical issues and applied perspectives (pp. 96123). Kavala, Greece: Saita Publications.Google Scholar
Pawlak, M. (2020). Grammar and good language teachers. In Griffiths, C. & Tajeddin, Z. (Eds.), Lessons from good language teachers (pp. 219–231). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Platsidou, M., & Sipitanou, A. (2014). Exploring relationships with grade level, gender and language proficiency in the foreign language learning strategy use of children and early adolescents. International Journal of Research Studies in Language Learning, 4(1), 8396.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Plonsky, L. (2011). The effectiveness of second language strategy instruction: A meta-analysis. Language Learning, 61(4), 9931038.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Psaltou-Joycey, A. (2010). Language learning strategies in the foreign language classroom. Thessaloniki: University Studio Press.Google Scholar
Psaltou-Joycey, A. (2014). Language learning SI: The English language coursebooks in the Greek state schools. Journal of Applied Linguistics, 29(1), 623.Google Scholar
Psaltou-Joycey, A. (Ed.). (2015). Foreign language learning SI: A teacher’s guide. Kavala, Greece: Saita Publications. Retrieved from: www.saitabooks.eu/2015/ebook.162.html.Google Scholar
Psaltou-Joycey, A. (forthcoming). Designing materials and guidelines for language learning strategy instruction. In Chamot, A. U. & Harris, V. (Eds.), Learning strategies instruction in the language classroom: Issues and implementation. Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
Psaltou-Joycey, A., Agathopoulou, E., Joycey, E., Sougari, A-M., Kazamia, V., Petrogiannis, K., & Gavriilidou, Ζ. (forthcoming). Promotion of language learning strategies by Greek EFL teachers through classroom instruction practices. The Language Learning Journal 46(5), 557–568.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Psaltou-Joycey, A., & Gavriilidou, Z. (2018). Language learning strategies of Greek EFL primary and secondary school learners: How individual characteristics affect strategy use. In Oxford, R. L. & Amerstorfer, C. M. (Eds.), Language learning strategies and individual learner characteristics: Situating strategy use in diverse contexts (pp. 167187). London: Bloomsbury.Google Scholar
Psaltou-Joycey, A., Sougari, A. M., Agathopoulou, E., & Alexiou, T. (2014). The role of age, gender and L1 strategies in the L2 strategies of primary school children in Greece. In Kotzoglou, G., Nikolou, K., Karantzola, E., Frantzi, K., Galantomos, I., Georgalidou, M., Kourti-Kazoullis, V., Papadopoulou, C., & Vlachou, E. (Eds.), Selected papers of the 11th international conference on Greek linguistics (pp. 14361448). Rhodes, Greece: University of the Aegean.Google Scholar
Richards, J. (1996). Teachers’ maxims in language learning. TESOL Quarterly, 30(2), 281296.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rubin, J. (1975). What the “good language learner” can tell us. TESOL Quarterly, 9(1), 4151.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rubin, J. (2010). Language teacher education: Challenges in promoting a learner-centered perspective. Revista Canaria de Estudios Ingleses, 61, 2942.Google Scholar
Schulz, R. A. (2000). Foreign language teacher development: MLJ perspectives – 1916–1999. The Modern Language Journal, 84(4), 495522.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tamjid, N. H., & Babazadeh, N. (2012). Comparing intermediate EFL students’ and teachers’ perceptions of listening comprehension strategy use. World Applied Sciences Journal, 16(9), 13081313.Google Scholar
Wenden, A. L. (1991). Learner strategies for learner autonomy: Planning and implementing learner training for language learners. Eaglewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.Google Scholar