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4 - ‘In and Out’

Working State Capital in Tanzania

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 May 2022

Kathy Dodworth
Affiliation:
University of Edinburgh
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Summary

One of the starkest legitimation practices lies in how non-governmental organizations (NGOs) positioned themselves vis-à-vis the organs of the state and vice versa. There is no more enduring division in political science than that posited between ‘state’ and ‘society’: a divide that is blurred in practice but remains ideationally pertinent in Tanzania’s political landscape. NGOs work the state–society ideational divide and garner capital from both. This chapter maps the use of state relations but also ‘state-like practices’ by Bagamoyo’s two international NGOs. One was heavily aligned with government practices to the point of mimicry and indeed co-extended with and co-produced the state. This worked to great effect in some cases and to abject failure in others. The other international NGO, by contrast, was increasingly distant from and antagonistic to local and national government, meaning its fortunes were precisely reversed. In both cases, however, positionalities were not fixed. Both NGOs varied their stances towards local government when expedient, highlighting how legitimation is continually recalibrated. Positionality vis-à-vis the state is thus fluid and ambiguous but remains strategic and deliberately visible, in crafting the space to govern.

Type
Chapter
Information
Legitimation as Political Practice
Crafting Everyday Authority in Tanzania
, pp. 91 - 117
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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  • ‘In and Out’
  • Kathy Dodworth, University of Edinburgh
  • Book: Legitimation as Political Practice
  • Online publication: 05 May 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009030397.007
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To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

  • ‘In and Out’
  • Kathy Dodworth, University of Edinburgh
  • Book: Legitimation as Political Practice
  • Online publication: 05 May 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009030397.007
Available formats
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Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • ‘In and Out’
  • Kathy Dodworth, University of Edinburgh
  • Book: Legitimation as Political Practice
  • Online publication: 05 May 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009030397.007
Available formats
×