Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-dc8c957cd-mgc9c Total loading time: 0.227 Render date: 2022-01-29T08:50:23.590Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 July 2013

Jutta Brunnée
Affiliation:
University of Toronto
Stephen J. Toope
Affiliation:
University of British Columbia, Vancouver
Get access

Summary

On 15 February 2003, millions of people around the world marched in the streets of their towns and cities to protest the impending invasion of Iraq by a ‘coalition of the willing’ led by the government of the United States of America. Media reports conservatively estimated crowds of 750,000 in London, 600,000 in Madrid, 500,000 in Berlin, 150,000 in Melbourne, 100,000 in New York, and possibly over a million in Rome, where estimates varied wildly. Smaller, but vocal demonstrations were held in scores of cities around the world. When all the numbers are pulled together, this was probably one of the largest mass protests in human history.

The motivations behind individual decisions to protest were undoubtedly various, but underlying many decisions was a sense that the planned invasion broke the rules of international law. In a contemporaneous address, Pope John Paul II invoked the Charter of the United Nations Organization ‘and international law itself’ to conclude that ‘war cannot be decided upon, even when it is a matter of ensuring the common good, except as the very last option and in accordance with very strict conditions, without ignoring the consequences for the civilian population both during and after the military operations’. A protester in Boston described the Iraq war as ‘unjust’ and ‘a war of aggression’. An 11-year-old Muslim boy protesting in Los Angeles declared: ‘We are here to show our support because we think [President George W.] Bush is doing something wrong … The U.N. inspectors, they didn’t get much time, and Bush is just bringing, like, flimsy evidence.’

Type
Chapter
Information
Legitimacy and Legality in International Law
An Interactional Account
, pp. 1 - 19
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2010

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
2
Cited by

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

  • Introduction
  • Jutta Brunnée, University of Toronto, Stephen J. Toope, University of British Columbia, Vancouver
  • Book: Legitimacy and Legality in International Law
  • Online publication: 05 July 2013
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511781261.002
Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

  • Introduction
  • Jutta Brunnée, University of Toronto, Stephen J. Toope, University of British Columbia, Vancouver
  • Book: Legitimacy and Legality in International Law
  • Online publication: 05 July 2013
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511781261.002
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Introduction
  • Jutta Brunnée, University of Toronto, Stephen J. Toope, University of British Columbia, Vancouver
  • Book: Legitimacy and Legality in International Law
  • Online publication: 05 July 2013
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511781261.002
Available formats
×