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Chapter Two - Criminal Prosecutions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 September 2018

Richard L. Abel
Affiliation:
University of California, Los Angeles
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Summary

Federal courts have tried hundreds of alleged terrorists since 9/11. Because the government sought to prevent acts of terrorism, it often used informants to elicit inculpatory words and actions, sometimes by providing the very weapons of destruction. As a result, almost every accused was convicted, even though some might never have committed a terrorist act without the informant's intervention. Otherwise, trials did not differ significantly from conventional criminal prosecutions: judges scrupulously insisted on due process, even when dealing with obstreperous defendants; and juries took their duties seriously, sometimes hanging because of one dissenter.
Type
Chapter
Information
Law's Trials
The Performance of Legal Institutions in the US 'War on Terror'
, pp. 24 - 102
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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  • Criminal Prosecutions
  • Richard L. Abel, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Book: Law's Trials
  • Online publication: 06 September 2018
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108555227.002
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Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

  • Criminal Prosecutions
  • Richard L. Abel, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Book: Law's Trials
  • Online publication: 06 September 2018
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108555227.002
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Criminal Prosecutions
  • Richard L. Abel, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Book: Law's Trials
  • Online publication: 06 September 2018
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108555227.002
Available formats
×