Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-2bkkj Total loading time: 0.36 Render date: 2022-10-02T01:28:26.064Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": true, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Book contents

3 - Permian and Triassic geologic events in Sonora, northwestern Mexico

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 October 2009

J. M. Dickins
Affiliation:
Australian Geological Survey Organisation, Canberra
Yang Zunyi
Affiliation:
China University of Geosciences, Wukan
Yin Hongfu
Affiliation:
China University of Geosciences, Wukan
S. G. Lucas
Affiliation:
New Mexico Museum of Natural History
S. K. Acharyya
Affiliation:
Geological Survey of India
Get access

Summary

The Palaeozoic and Mesozoic strata of northwestern Mexico are exposed in small, scattered areas in Sonora and Baja California because of the Tertiary tectonic events in normal faulting, the pervasive effects of Tertiary intrusives, and the widespread volcanic cover of the Sierra Madre Occidental (Figure 3.1). However, the early investigations, followed by more recent geologic work in that region, allow us to unravel the late Palaeozoic and early Mesozoic sedimentologic and tectonic history of that part of Mexico.

In this chapter we examine the sedimentologic and tectonic history of the Permian and Triassic geologic events in northwestern Mexico, with special reference to the state of Sonora. The younger Palaeozoic rocks of Sonora are of early and middle Permian age. These rocks are parts of thicker Palaeozoic successions that are of cratonic-platform character in the northeastern part of the state, of shallow-water miogeoclinal character in the northwestern and central parts of Sonora, and of deep-water eugeoclinal character in the central part of the state (Figure 3.2). Permian rocks of eugeoclinal character have been reported from one locality in Baja California. The Triassic rocks of Sonora, which are of Carnian and Norian age, can be grouped into two lithotectonic assemblages. In the central part of the state, these rocks are recognized as part of the Barranca Group (Alencaster, 1961a), whereas in northwestern Sonora they are included in the Antimonio Formation (González-León, 1980).

Type
Chapter

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×