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12 - Language Socialization in Classrooms

Findings, Issues, and Possibilities

from Part IV - Conclusion

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2020

Matthew J. Burdelski
Affiliation:
Osaka University
Kathryn M. Howard
Affiliation:
California State University, Channel Islands
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Summary

This chapter presents a brief history of the “first wave” oflanguage socialization research (1980s) and related research occurring during the same time in communities and classrooms. It discusses how research on language socialization has increasingly focused over the years on educational settings both inside and outside of classrooms, including schools, universities, and virtual spaces, where students from various backgrounds frequently have to negotiate changing and multiple languages, norms, roles, ideologies, identities, curricula, and/or ethnolinguistic communities.The chapter summarizes the major findings of the ten empirical cases studies presented in this volume, ties together some common themes among them, and argues that more attention needs to be paid towards examining outcomes of language socialization processes. It also offers suggestions of avenues for further exploration of the process of language socialization inside (and outside) classrooms.

Type
Chapter
Information
Language Socialization in Classrooms
Culture, Interaction, and Language Development
, pp. 249 - 264
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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