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Part II - The United States Context

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 July 2019

Thomas Ricento
Affiliation:
University of Calgary
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Summary

This chapter argues that disciplining of bilingual education as a scholarly field served to divorce discussions of bilingual education from broader political and economic struggles in favor of the seemingly objective pursuit of the benefits of bilingual education. This disciplining of bilingual education was part of a larger discursive shift that reframed discussions of racial inequality from a focus on unequal access and the need for structural change to a focus on the deficiencies of racialized communities and the need for modifying these deficiencies. The chapter ends with a call for bilingual education scholars to situate issues of language inequality within the broader white supremacist and capitalist relations of power. This will offer bilingual education scholars tools for rejecting deficit perspectives of language-minoritized children and pointing to the broader racial stratification that makes these deficit perspectives possible to begin with.

Type
Chapter
Information
Language Politics and Policies
Perspectives from Canada and the United States
, pp. 95 - 210
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

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