Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-rlmms Total loading time: 0.373 Render date: 2021-10-16T19:23:53.477Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

21 - Finding a place in Sydney: migrants and language change

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 July 2010

Get access

Summary

Introduction

When migrants enter their new country, they are immediately faced with the sometimes daunting task of finding a place to live. Studies of urban settlement patterns record that migrants often are concentrated in certain parts of cities; Little Italy and Chinatown in New York City may be among the better-known ethnic communities in the world, but they are far from unique. Ethnic neighbourhoods give migrants a place in the new country where they can speak their own language and obtain the goods and services they need to maintain to some degree the way of life they grew up with.

Ethnic communities are not entirely separate entities, however, built on the edge of town. They are created within the confines of the host community, occupying areas once exclusively the domain of the host community or areas vacated by other, often more upwardly mobile ethnic minorities. Initially, the hosts may be attracted by some of the innovations brought in by the migrants, notably the food and the festivals, but it is rare for the hosts to hold the ethnic communities in high regard. Nevertheless, whether the host is attracted or repelled, in finding a place for themselves, migrants bring about quite often dramatic changes in the host community.

Type
Chapter
Information
Language in Australia , pp. 304 - 317
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1991

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
7
Cited by

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×